Drone U Podcast: How Canada Has Embraced Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

The Citizen's Guide to the Future
Feb. 12 2014 11:06 AM

Drone U Podcast: How Canada Has Embraced Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

177169380-drone-hovers-over-petrie-island-park-in-ottawa-canada
A drone hovers over Petrie Island park in Ottawa, Canada.

Photo by MICHEL COMTE/AFP/Getty Images

Every week on Future Tense, we highlight a talk from Drone U in which a leading thinker speaks about what our drone future may look like. Drone U is produced in cooperation with the New America Foundation. (Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University.)

This week, Drone U features a podcast from Shayna Gersher of the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton University in Ottawa. Gersher looks at Canada’s role in the emerging global drone industry and how the government and private sector work to promote the use of unmanned aerial vehicles.

Advertisement

Canada was one of the first countries in the world to have civil regulations governing drone use, starting in 1996, and the strengths and weaknesses of its approach may have lessons for U.S. agencies as they write their regulations for commercial use in 2015 (or maybe later). Gersher points out that the current joint efforts between businesses and transportation agency technocrats are not set up to address the social and political circumstances around the technology. But one benefit to Canada being an early adopter of drone technology is clear. It has already been able to try out exciting applications like keeping their beaches clear of goose droppings while the United States is only just beginning to allow testing of commercial applications at six test sites around the country. 

Future Tense is a partnership of SlateNew America, and Arizona State University.

Timothy Reuter is co-creator of Drone U and the founder of the D.C. Area Drone User Group. He also works on issues of international development.

Nabiha Syed is a media lawyer in New York and a visiting fellow at the Yale Law School Information Society Project.  She is the co-founder of DroneU.

TODAY IN SLATE

Foreigners

More Than Scottish Pride

Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 

What Charles Barkley Gets Wrong About Corporal Punishment and Black Culture

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

Three Talented Actresses in Three Terrible New Shows

Why Do Some People See the Virgin Mary in Grilled Cheese?

The science that explains the human need to find meaning in coincidences.

Jurisprudence

Happy Constitution Day!

Too bad it’s almost certainly unconstitutional.

Is It Worth Paying Full Price for the iPhone 6 to Keep Your Unlimited Data Plan? We Crunch the Numbers.

What to Do if You Literally Get a Bug in Your Ear

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 17 2014 8:15 AM Ted Cruz Will Not Join a Protest of "The Death of Klinghoffer" After All
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 8:43 PM This 17-Minute Tribute to David Fincher Is the Perfect Preparation for Gone Girl
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 6:40 PM This iPhone 6 Feature Will Change Weather Forecasting
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 17 2014 7:30 AM Ring Around the Rainbow
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.