Gawker HACKED: Was your Gawker password hacked? Find out here.

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Dec. 13 2010 1:44 PM

Was Your Gawker Password Hacked?

Use our widget to find out.

This weekend, Gawker Media's servers were hacked, leaving many user accounts and their corresponding passwords vulnerable. Nearly 1.25 million accounts, including more than 500,000 user e-mails and more than 185,000 decrypted passwords, were posted to the Pirate Bay. Right now, some hackers appear to be using those usernames and passwords to tweet about Acai Berries.

How can you tell if your account was hacked? Use our handy widget, below. Just type in the e-mail address you used for your account—we won't be storing these addresses or using them for any other purpose—to see if you've been exposed. [Update: The widget now scans all e-mail addresses and user names in this weekend's release. The original version scanned only for e-mail addresses.]

What should you do if your account's been compromised? Gawker is recommending that all commenters change their passwords, which is an extremely good idea. It's also smart to change any other accounts that used that same password. Click here to read Farhad Manjoo's advice on creating a superstrong password.

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Correction, Dec. 13, 2010: The widget originally overstated your chances of having been compromised. If you left a comment but did not sign up for an account with Gawker, your data would not have been compromised.

Dan Check is Slate's Director of Technology.

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