Harper's magazine disputes Shafer's critique of its Guantánamo expose.

Media criticism.
Feb. 2 2010 5:32 PM

Harper's to Shafer: You're All Wet on the Gitmo Story

And Shafer responds.

(Continued from Page 2)

Mr. Horton's article states that "past the perimeter checkpoint known as ACP Roosevelt, there were only two destinations. One was a beach where soldiers went to swim. The other was Camp No." That statement isn't true. The checkpoint was on the main road between the Naval Station and the detention camps. After driving from the detention camps and passing the checkpoint, every facility on the Naval Station was a potential destination. This includes facilities to which detainees were sometimes transported, including the main hospital and the military commission building.

A Google map of the Guantánamo camps and vicinity, embedded below, supports Sullivan's point.

The upshot of Horton's geographical error? The "paddy wagon" that Hickman says he saw depart from the camp with prisoners could have gone to destinations other than "Camp No." Even the paddy wagon's third trip, that Hickman has turning left toward "Camp No" after clearing the checkpoint, could have continued past the turn-off for "Camp No," if I understand the map correctly. (For an additional point of reference, see this link to the map Harper's annotated.)

Perhaps I'm misreading Horton. If so, let me know. If not, I really want to hear from you.

Regards,
Jack Shafer

******

Did you serve at Guantánamo. Let me hear from you, too. Send e-mail to  slate.pressbox@gmail.com or take orders from my Twitter feed. (E-mail may be quoted by name in "The Fray," Slate's readers' forum; in a future article; or elsewhere unless the writer stipulates otherwise. Permanent disclosure: Slate is owned by the Washington Post Co.)

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