Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of Dec. 2

Slate's mistakes.
Dec. 6 2013 4:00 AM

Corrections

Slate’s mistakes.

Due to a production error, in the Dec. 6 Slate Quiz the quiz interactive originally mismarked the correct answer to the final question. The Slate contestant's score was changed to reflect that he answered correctly.

In a Dec. 5 Bad Astronomy post, Phil Plated misidentified Christina Tarsell as Emily Tarsell. Emily is Christina's mother's name.

In a Dec. 5 Moneybox, Jessica Winter misstated that Linda Tirado attended Cranbrook. Though Tirado won a scholarship to the school, she did not enroll.

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In a Dec. 4 Science, Eric Michael Johnson wrote that saddle-backed tamarins are socially monogamous. Recent research has shown that they are not.

In a Dec. 4 XX Factor blog post, Amanda Marcotte misidentified the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

In a Dec. 3 Books, Adrian Van Young misstated the title of Colson Whitehead’s novel Zone One. Due to an editing error, Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi's first name was also misspelled.

In a Dec. 3 Moneybox, Emma Roller misspelled Eddie Colla's last name.

In a Dec. 2 Education, Jessica Roake misspelled author Anne Moody's first name.

In a Dec. 2 Moneybox blog post, Matthew Yglesias misidentified the Chinese currency RMB as RMD.

In a Dec. 2 Moneybox blog post, Matthew Yglesias stated that a 1995 article by Clifford Stoll appeared in Time magazine. It was published in Newsweek.

In a Dec. 2 Next Silicon Valley article, David Auerbach misspelled Martin Kenney's last name.

In a Nov. 27 Weigel blog post, Emma Roller misstated that healthcare.gov contractors testified at hearings before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. In fact, the hearings were before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

In a Nov. 24, 2013 War Stories, Fred Kaplan misidentified Benjamin Netanyahu as the president of Israel. He is the prime minister.

The headline of an Oct. 23 Atlas Obscura post misstated that philosopher Jeremy Bentham died in 1850. He died in 1832.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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