Ben Carson: Muslim Unfit to be President Because Islam is Inconsistent With Constitution

Ben Carson: Muslim Unfit to Be President Because Islam Is Inconsistent With Constitution

Ben Carson: Muslim Unfit to Be President Because Islam Is Inconsistent With Constitution

The Slatest
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Sept. 20 2015 12:01 PM

Ben Carson: Muslim Unfit to Be President Because Islam Is Inconsistent With Constitution

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Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during a campaign rally at the Anaheim Convention Center on Sept. 9, 2015 in Anaheim, California.

Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson says he would not support a Muslim to become president of the United States. In fact, he believes a Muslim would not be fit to be president, because he doesn’t think Islam is consistent with the country’s Constitution. “I would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation. I absolutely would not agree with that,” Carson said on NBC’s Meet the Press.

When he was asked whether a president’s faith should matter to voters, Carson said it depended on the faith. “If it's inconsistent with the values and principles of America, then of course it should matter,” he said. “But if it fits within the realm of America and consistent with the Constitution, I have no problem.” When NBC’s Chuck Todd asked Carson whether Islam was consistent with the Constitution the retired neurosurgeon said: “No, I don’t.” And what about Congress? Would he vote for a Muslim lawmaker? “Congress is a different story,” Carson said. “It depends on who that Muslim is and what their policies are.”

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Todd also asked Donald Trump on Meet the Press whether he’d be comfortable if a Muslim ever became president. “I can say that it’s something that at some point could happen, we’ll see … Would I be comfortable? I don’t know that we have to address it right now … Some people have said it already happened.”

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the Today’s Papers column from 2006 to 2009. Follow him on Twitter.