Junot Díaz is “Live at Politics & Prose,” a New Slate Podcast

Today's best authors.
Nov. 20 2012 8:08 AM

Junot Díaz, Live at Politics & Prose

Slate’s newest podcast features today’s best authors at D.C.’s iconic bookstore.

Dominican MIT professor Junot Diaz, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his novel 'The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao'.
Dominican MIT professor Junot Diaz, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao in Santo Domingo, 2008.

Photo by Ricardo Hernandez/AFP/Getty Images.

If you aren’t familiar with Washington’s storied independent book shop Politics & Prose, it might have crossed your radar at 11:30 p.m. Saturday. The cold open of NBC’s Saturday Night Live featured a reading by a fictional Paula Broadwell at a fictional Politics & Prose. The ersatz Broadwell read from a copy of All In, the real Broadwell’s now-infamous hagiography of her lover Gen. David Petraeus, but SNL’s version makes the book sound more like Fifty Shades of Grey. (You can watch the sketch here.)

Paula Broadwell’s real appearance at Politics & Prose in February wasn’t quite as salacious, but it was a reminder of the amazing parade of authors who stop regularly at P&P’s inviting Connecticut Avenue storefront in Northwest D.C. And starting today, Slate is teaming up with P&P to bring you “Live at Politics & Prose,” podcast versions of author appearances by some of the world’s most fascinating writers. The first episode features Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Junot Díaz discussing his new story collection, This Is How You Lose Her.

Díaz’s reading was actually recorded at Washington’s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, although most of the events you’ll hear in the coming months will be taped in the store itself. If you’d like to attend upcoming readings, check out P&P’s events calendar.

And subscribe to the Slate Daily Podcast in iTunes or with our RSS Feed to catch all upcoming episodes of “Live at Politics & Prose” (an individual feed for the series is coming soon).

Andy Bowers is the executive producer of Slate’s podcasts. Follow him on Twitter.

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