Everything You Need To Know About Occupy Wall Street

A Complete guide to the Anti-Corporate Protests Taking Place Around the Nation

Who's winning, who's losing, and why.
Oct. 13 2011 7:29 PM

Everything You Need To Know About Occupy Wall Street

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A complete guide to the anti-corporate protests taking place around the nation.

Where did the Occupy Wall Street movement come from? Nobody seriously expected thousands of people to hit the streets (or camp on them) for weeksand protest the rotten economy, growing inequality, and the shifty titans of finance. But there were people who tried to make it happen, and there are people who’ve found themselves swept in by the tide.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

Here’s a guide to Slate’s coverage of Occupy Wall Street. The timeline, which will be updated, tracks the origins of the movement from some wishful op-eds to actual arrests. The glossary explains the terms and the players. This diagram maps the intersection between #OWS and the Tea Party.

Elsewhere in Slate:

Heather Murphy compiles the photos from the surprise eviction of protestors at Zuccotti Park.

David Weigel explains how a 78-year-old retiree could help the Koch Bothers battle OWS.

Joseph E. Stiglitz says Occupy protestors are part of a worldwide movement against inequality.

Eliot Spitzer offers some advice for protestors pondering their next move.

Beverly Gage urges occupiers to take a cue from organized labor at the turn of the 20th century.

KJ Dell’Antonia considers whether Occupy Wall Street is a teachable moment for children.

Untitled Document  The Tea Party and the Occupiers: Can They Just Get Along?

David Weigel chronicles Republican attempts to answer anti-Wall Street protestors.

Dahlia Lithwick explains how the movement confuses and ignores media pundits.

David Weigel reports that the Occupy movement found its footing in Las Vegas.

Simon Doonan documents the deliriously diverse fashion trends at Zuccotti Park.

Dahlia Lithwick says protestors angry at the Supreme Court have more to worry about than Citizens United.

Dahlia Lithwick offers legal guidelines for protestors trying to avoid getting arrested.

Anne Applebaum questions just how democratic the Occupy movement really is.

Heather Murphy gives you the photo quiz: Occupier or Tea Partier?

 Annie Lowrey asks if the Occupiers have a point about the 1 percent.

David Weigel spends two days in New York watching the Occupiers in action.

Eliot Spitzer says the movement has already won.

Annie Lowrey introduces the 53 Percenters, the would-be neo-Tea Party anti-Occupy movement.

Jacob Weisberg compares and contrasts the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street.

 

If you want to watch a Tea Partier turn red-faced and start smashing things, compare his movement to Occupy Wall Street. “We here at the Tea Party Express find those comparisons to be insulting,” wrote that group’s spokeswoman, Amy Kremer, in a jeremiad/fundraising appeal. “Their motivations, their behavior and their disrespect for the principles that made this country great could not stand in starker contrast to ours.”

The feeling isn’t mutual. Many Occupiers think that their nascent movement should have started years ago. Van Jones, the former White House adviser who’s trying to build a left-wing Tea Party, has welded together the two movements in a series of speeches. With Occupy Wall Street, he has said, Obama-era liberals have gone from “hopey to mopey” and finally captured the oomph that the Tea Party used to have.

How much do the movements actually have in common? The Venn diagram below plots the concerns, allies, heroes, and inspirations of the two movements. It illustrates where and how they intersect, and which of them have opposite, anti-matter versions on the other side.