Detroit's cheap dates

A mostly political Weblog.
Sept. 2 2007 5:27 AM

Detroit's Cheap Dates

Plus--O'Reilly was right about Bourne.

(Continued from Page 18)

Iraqi troops and police may be very keen to assist, if not lead the way, in this mission—at least if Shiite forces are called on to help Shiites, Sunni forces to help Sunnis.

Does he mean that Shiite forces would be keen to help Shiites relocate? At the moment, Shiite forces seem most keen on helping Sunnis relocate. It's not clear to me why they would want to assist in the de facto cleansing of their own people--in effect, surrendering a piece of turf to their rivals. Likewise, why would Sunnis help Baghdad become a wholly Shiite city? ...

P.S.: One way to characterize Bush's second term in domestic policy is that he's consistently moved to Plan B too late to salvage anything from the demise of his Plan A. That was certainly the case on Social Security reform, and in all probability will be the final story on immigration. Will he replicate that misjudgment on Iraq? ...  1:07 A.M. link

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Bob Wright doesn't know who "Jess and Nick" are. ... Or "K-Fed." ... 12:48 A.M. link

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Wednesday, August 8, 2007

Tout le Gauche: Markos Moulitsas' co-author and MyDD blogger Jerome Armstrong--recently quoted assessing the state of the left blogosphere in Salon--has agreed to pay $30,000 to the S.E.C. to settle stock-touting allegations, according to TimesSelect prisoner Chris Suellentrop. That seems like quite a bit to me, though I'm no S.E.C. expert. It apparently includes a $20,000 fine. From the S.E.C.'s news release, with emphasis added:

The Commission's Complaint, filed on April 14, 2003, alleged that beginning on March 6, 2000, Armstrong touted the stock of BluePoint Linux Software Corporation ("BluePoint") by posting unsubstantiated, favorable buy recommendations on the Raging Bull internet site. Armstrong posted over eighty such recommendations during the first three weeks that the stock of BluePoint was publicly traded. According to the Complaint, Armstrong praised BluePoint's investment value and encouraged investors who were experiencing trouble having their orders filled to keep trying. The Complaint further alleged that the promoters of BluePoint were secretly transferring stock in three other companies to Armstrong at prices below the then current market for those three stocks and that Armstrong made at least $20,000 by selling the shares he received from the promoters of BluePoint. The Complaint alleges that Armstrong did not disclose in his internet postings that he was being compensated for making the postings.

That's just the complaint, of course. Still ... what's he touting now? ... P.S.: Red State eagerly awaits the long-promised Armstrong "offensive." ... He could start by issuing either a confirmation or denial of the truth of the SEC's charge. The settlement itself is neither. But if Armstrong doesn't owe the SEC an admit-or-deny answer, doesn't he owe it to everyone else--his allies, his readers, his colleagues? Is it true, Jerome? ... 1:23 P.M.

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