Corrections from the last week.

Slate's mistakes.
Aug. 5 2011 6:53 AM

Corrections

Red pen.

In an Aug. 5 " Slatest" post, Peter Fulham incorrectly stated that Galileo discovered Jupiter. The astronomer is credited with discovering the planet's moons, not the planet itself, which is visible from Earth.

In an Aug. 3 "Brow Beat" blog post, Nina Shen Rastogi wrote that The White Shadow was Hitchcock's earliest feature; it is believed to be Hitchcock's earliest surviving feature.

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In the Aug. 2 "Books," Walter Kirn wrote that Joseph Heller's 1974 novel, Something Happened, came out in 1970.

In the Aug. 2 "Politics," David Weigel mischaracterized how the demands of Moody's raters on Washington policy makers changed during the debt debate, "from favoring a clean deal to demanding one." More accurately, they ultimately demanded a deal with deep cuts, not a "clean deal."

In an Aug. 2 "Weigel" blog post, David Weigel listed Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-Kan., as a representative from Indiana.

In the Aug. 1 "Sports Nut," Robert Whitingstated that Hideki Irabu's wife left him in April. While it's been widely reported that she left this year, the exact date of her departure isn't known.

In the Aug. 1 "Transport," Tom Vanderbilt misidentified the Boulevard de Jardy. In the same article, a photo caption located the diverging diamond interchange at I-270 and Dorsett Road in Springfield, Mo., and stated that it was the first of its kind in the nation. The Dorsett Road interchange in the photo is near St. Louis and is not the first of its kind.

In a July 30 update in "The Slatest," Ben Johnson misidentified Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., as representing Utah.

In the Nov. 17, 2010, "War Stories," Fred Kaplan misstated a missile program cost as $100 million rather than $100 billion.

In the Jan. 25, 2008 "Green Room," Eilene Zimmerman incorrectly stated that "toilet-to-tap" recycling supplies 40 percent of El Paso's drinking water. That number was 20 times too high: The correct value is 2 percent.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our reader discussion forum "The Fray" or our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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