Newlywed finance: My husband and I work out the details of our joint account.

How couples manage their money.
Feb. 11 2011 7:14 AM

The Big Bad Budget Talk

My husband and I work out the details of our joint account.

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Sometime sharers.
Jessica Grose Jessica Grose

Jessica Grose is a frequent Slate contributor and the author of the novel Sad Desk Salad. Follow her on Twitter.

On a recent afternoon I spent 15 minutes talking to my friendly Time Warner Cable representative, canceling our landline and several superfluous cable channels. This phone call was a direct result of the budget talk I had with my husband on a rainy Saturday. I was the one who insisted on having the landline installed when we first moved in together. Back then I used it for reporting calls because I worked from home and our cell reception was shoddy. But that was a job and an apartment ago. Now that we're going to be paying for our cable package with a joint account, it's time to cut the things we don't use.

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This kind of negotiation is all part of the process of becoming Sometime Sharers—couples who have a combination of joint and separate bank accounts. We started our cohabitating life as Independent Operators (couples who had entirely separate bank accounts) and discovered we weren't yet interested in being Common Potters (couples who have only shared accounts). When Mike and I decided to be Sometime Sharers, I worried that it would be difficult to decide what constituted a joint expense and what qualified as an individual expense. But in fact, it took us only about 20 minutes to figure it out.

Just by calmly sitting down together to discuss our budget, we were following the wise counsel of several readers. Last week, I asked Slate readers for the one piece of financial advice they would give a newlywed couple. Almost 200 commenters weighed in, and I received about 50 e-mails on the matter. One piece of advice that popped up over and over was that a couple should make a budget and stick to it—that was first on our financial to-do list. By blocking out an afternoon to focus on finance, we were following another piece of advice, courtesy of reader Lauren Bowman: "Schedule a time to discuss money, do not let the subject come up randomly when making purchases in a store or in the middle of a heated discussion."

I opened my Mint.com account to show Mike how much I had spent on groceries, utilities, dinners out, and entertainment in the month of January. He showed me his accounting for the same time period. Then we then added our after-tax salaries together. After a slightly tetchy back and forth (me: "Do we really need to spend that much on entertainment?" Mike: "Do you really want to stop buying so many books?"), we decided on the following budget. Our salaries are almost identical, so we are contributing the same amount to our joint account.

Our biggest expense is rent, which takes out 35 percent of our budget. This figure seemed like a lot. But as this Washington Post budget worksheet assured me, experts recommend spending between 25 and 40 percent of your salaries on rent/mortgage. Since we live in New York, the least affordable major metro area in the country, 35 percent on rent isn't unreasonable. For groceries, we've set aside 10 percent. We almost always eat breakfast at home, and make our own lunches about half the time. Dinners at home fluctuate somewhere between three and six times a week: Mike works in the film industry, so he frequently has work functions in the evening, and we both like to see friends on weeknights.

Speaking of those noncooking nights, we set aside 12 percent of our budget for going out. This also includes bars and taxis home. Mike and I padded this part of our expenses a bit because we're following commenter Ngstockard's advice: "Know your pain points—the things on which you each tend to spend carelessly." We know that we eat out more than we should—but at the end of a long work week, we like to treat ourselves to a moderately fancy dinner, and we're budgeting for that accordingly.

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