The Guantánamo Memoirs of Mohamedou Ould Slahi

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April 30 2013 5:28 AM

The Guantánamo Memoirs of Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Mohamedou Ould Slahi
Mohamedou Ould Slahi

For nearly 11 years, Mohamedou Ould Slahi has been a prisoner in Guantánamo. In 2005, he began to write his memoirs of his time in captivity. His handwritten 466-page manuscript is a harrowing account of his detention, interrogation, and abuse. Although his abuse has been corroborated by U.S. government officials, declassified documents, and independent investigators, Slahi tells his story with the detail and perspective that could only be known by himself and the people who have kept him captive. It is impossible for us to meet with him or independently verify his account. Until now, it has been impossible for him to tell his story.

This week, Slate has published a three-part series of excerpts from Slahi’s declassified memoirs. You can also read a single-page view of the three excerpts here. The entire project, including supplementary materials, is below.

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INTRODUCTION:
Who is Mohamedou Ould Slahi, and how did the United States keep him silent for more than a decade?




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PART ONE: ENDLESS INTERROGATIONS
He was tortured, beaten, and humiliated, and he remains in prison. Here is his story, in his own words.




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PART TWO: DISAPPEARED
When Slahi wouldn’t tell them what they wanted to hear, his captors took him on a torture cruise. They would make him disappear.



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PART THREE: FAMILY
Since the torture has stopped, Slahi has learned to play chess and tend to his garden. Today his interrogators are the closest thing he has to a family.



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INTERACTIVE TIMELINE:
Mohamedou Ould Slahi has been on an "endless world tour" of detention and interrogation. His life from arrest to today.




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INTERVIEW WITH COL. MORRIS DAVIS:
Guantánamo’s former chief prosecutor explains what Slahi is like and why the United States owes him more than his freedom.



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THE ORIGINAL:
Composed within Guantánamo’s walls, his memoir runs 466 pages. A portion of Slahi's manuscript, in his own hand.





Photo credits: (top to bottom) International Committee of the Red Cross, Reuters, Brennan Linsley/Reuters, Michelle Shephard/Reuters, Mark Wilson/Reuters, John Moore/Getty Images, Michelle Shephard/Reuters, no credit

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