Slate’s mistakes for the week of Oct. 10.

Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 10

Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 10

Slate's mistakes.
Oct. 14 2016 4:05 AM

Corrections

Slate’s mistakes.

In an Oct. 15 XX Factor, Katherine Bell mistakenly referred to a Bush/Dole 1992 campaign poster; the poster would have read Bush/Quayle.

In an Oct. 14 Politics, William Saletan misstated the year of a Hitler quote. It was 1922, not 1992.

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In an Oct. 14 Moneybox, Jordan Weissmann misquoted an audience member at an event about Donald Trump’s economic plans as saying she was interested in the “suggestion that Trump should fix the problems with Mr. Trump’s tax plan.” The correct quote was, “I was interested in your suggestion that Congress should fix the problems with Mr. Trump’s tax plan.”

In an Oct. 13 Assessment, Laura Bennett misstated that the Fox News talk show Red Eye airs at 3 p.m. It airs at 3 a.m.

In an Oct. 13 Lexicon Valley, Jonathon Green misidentified Irvine Welsh as Irving Welsh.

In an Oct. 12 Jurisprudence, Lara Bazelon misstated that each county in Pennsylvania has its own police chief. There are multiple police chiefs per county.

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In an Oct. 12 XX Factor, Torie Bosch misstated where Jill Harth's lawsuit against Trump, alleging sexual assault, was first widely reported. It was in the Boston Globe in April, not the New York Times in May.

In an Oct. 10 Science, Maureen McMurray and Taylor Quimby misstated that ginkgo trees bear fruit. Ginkgo trees bear their seeds in cones.

In an Oct. 10 Science, Natalie Shure misidentified the American Lung Association as the National Lung Association.

In an Oct. 7 Browbeat, Aisha Harris misstated that Vanessa Holden is an assistant professor in the African American studies department at Michigan State University. She is an assistant professor of history.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you’ve seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.