Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Aug. 27, 2012.

Slate's mistakes.
Aug. 31 2012 3:45 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In an Aug. 30 "Slatest" post, Josh Voorhees incorrectly identified the Tampa Bay Times as the Tribune.

In an Aug. 28 “Brow Beat” post, David Wanczyk originally said that Ryan Hall was listening to Ian McKellen read Robert Fagles' translation of The Odyssey. Hall actually seems to be listening to a non-McKellen voice actor read Samuel Butler's translation.

In the Aug. 28 “XX Factor,” Kerry Howley described Cathy McMorris Rodgers as the highest-ranking Republican in the House—she is the highest ranking Republican woman in the House. Howley also misstated the amount of money Sher Valenzuela’s company has accepted in government loans and contracts—it was $17 million, not $17 billion.

In an Aug. 27 “Explainer,” Katy Waldman wrote that the Republican Party held its first convention in 1832. It was the National Republican Party; the modern Republican Party grew out of the Whig party in 1854.

In an Aug. 27 "Future Tense" post, Will Oremus stated that the chances of suffering a direct hit from a hurricane if you live outside the National Hurricane Center's "cone of uncertainty" are roughly one in three. In fact, one in three represents merely the chances of the hurricane's eye passing outside of the cone at all. The chances of any single location outside the cone suffering a direct hit depend on the location but are presumably far lower than one in three.

In an Aug. 24 “Culturebox,” Michelle Dean referred to Fareed Zakaria as a Newsweek columnist. He writes for Time.

In an Aug. 23 “Science,” Jesse Bering wrote that the author of an anti-Semitic children’s book from 1938 Germany was executed as a war criminal. It was the book’s publisher who was executed.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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