Philosophical ruminations.
Dec. 24 1998 3:30 AM

News from academe.

(Continued from Page 1)

Faster, Pussycats! Cook! Cook!

Advertisement

Students at the Rhode Island School of Design have unveiled the "kitchen of the future." The utopian prototype, called the Universal Kitchen, is designed for maximum efficiency in cooking and cleaning: The 400 steps it now takes to prepare a modest dinner in an ordinary kitchen would be reduced to 100. Its oven would perform all the functions of a microwave, a broiler, and a conventional oven, as well as steam-cooking and steam-cleaning. According to Jane Langmuir, director of the project, "water and heat come together and create a totally new appliance." The model is currently on display at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York City. If it's ever built, the kitchen will come in two sizes, "min" and "max."

Dead Letters ...

The world's oldest and largest university press--Oxford--has just announced that it is canceling its poetry list. According to the Guardian, Oxford, which is, after Faber and Faber, the leading publisher of contemporary poetry in Britain, has cut loose its living poets, including such respected figures as Craig Raine and D.J. Enright. The dead poets Oxford publishes--including Lord Byron, Edmund Spenser, and William Wordsworth--will remain in print.

... and the Living Arts

The Modern Language Association has commissioned a documentary on the history of oral performance, from Homer to poetry slams--raucous readings in which the quality of poems is judged by the ferocity of audience response. Some critics find the popularity of the events an encouraging sign in a media-saturated age. But others--notably Harold Bloom and Helen Vendler--view the rise of the slam with alarm. Bloom, after reading the work of some contest winners, declared them "of a badness not to be believed."

TODAY IN SLATE

Foreigners

More Than Scottish Pride

Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 

What Charles Barkley Gets Wrong About Corporal Punishment and Black Culture

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

If You’re Outraged by the NFL, Follow This Satirical Blowhard on Twitter

The Best Way to Organize Your Fridge

Politics

The GOP’s Focus on Fake Problems

Why candidates like Scott Walker are building campaigns on drug tests for the poor and voter ID laws.

Sports Nut

Giving Up on Goodell

How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.

Is It Worth Paying Full Price for the iPhone 6 to Keep Your Unlimited Data Plan? We Crunch the Numbers.

Farewell! Emily Bazelon on What She Will Miss About Slate.

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 16 2014 7:03 PM Kansas Secretary of State Loses Battle to Protect Senator From Tough Race
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 8:43 PM This 17-Minute Tribute to David Fincher Is the Perfect Preparation for Gone Girl
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 6:40 PM This iPhone 6 Feature Will Change Weather Forecasting
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 16 2014 4:09 PM It’s All Connected What links creativity, conspiracy theories, and delusions? A phenomenon called apophenia.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.