Why Hasn’t the NBA Ever Done Anything About Donald Sterling? Blame David Stern.

Slate's sports podcast.
April 28 2014 5:19 PM

Hang Up and Listen: The Sterling’s Reputation Edition

Slate’s sports podcast on the Clippers owner, Michael Pineda’s pine tar suspension, and UFC champ Jon “Bones” Jones. 

Listen to Hang Up and Listen with Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

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In this week’s episode of Slate’s sports podcast Hang Up and Listen, Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca discuss Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling’s alleged racist comments, and why the NBA has tolerated his terrible behavior. They also talk about Michael Pineda’s 10-game suspension for putting pine tar on a baseball, and the disconnect between MLB’s ban of the practice and its apparent ubiquity. Finally, they are joined by Tim Marchman of Deadspin to discuss UFC light heavyweight champion Jon “Bones” Jones, and whether he is poised to become a crossover star.

Here are links to some of the articles and other items mentioned on the show:

Hang Up and Listen’s weekly licorice juice:

Mike’s licorice juice: Remembering the (spiritual) father of the father of basketball, Luther Gulick.

Stefan’s licorice juice: LA Times columnist David Lazarus on his role in the film Bad News Bears.

Josh’s licorice juice: Should McGill University change its maybe-offensive, maybe-Indian nickname?

Podcast production and edit by Mike Vuolo. Links compiled by Casey Butterly.

You can email us at hangup@slate.com.

Stefan Fatsis is the author of Word Freak and A Few Seconds of Panic, a regular guest on NPR's All Things Considered, and a panelist on Hang Up and Listen

Josh Levin is Slate's executive editor.

Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.

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