Are the 34–0 Wichita State Shockers All They’re Cracked Up to Be?

Slate's sports podcast.
March 10 2014 5:44 PM

Hang Up and Listen: The Everything’s in Jeopardy Edition

Slate’s sports podcast on Wichita State’s undefeated run, slowing down college football, and quiz show star Arthur Chu.

Listen to Hang Up and Listen with Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

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Hang Up and Listen is brought to you by Audible. Get a 30-day free trial by signing up at audiblepodcast.com/hangup. Our pick this week is Slow Getting Up by Nate Jackson.

In this week’s episode of Slate’s sports podcast Hang Up and Listen, Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca are joined by analytics guru Ken Pomeroy to discuss the undefeated Wichita State Shockers and other college basketball matters. They also talk about the Nick Saban-endorsed proposal to limit the pace of play in college football and whether it’s designed to make the game safer or just slow down up-tempo offenses. Finally, they are joined by Ken Jennings to consider the ascent of Jeopardy! bad boy Arthur Chu, and whether there is a proper way to play the quiz show.

Here are links to some of the articles and other items mentioned on the show:

Hang Up and Listen’s weekly triple stumpers:

Mike’s triple stumper: illuminating the connection between daylight saving time and golf, and golf’s enormous financial interest in DST.

Stefan’s triple stumper: revisiting the undefeated 1970–71 Penn Quakers, as well as the tragic life of Howard Porter, the man who made that undefeated record possible.

Josh’s triple stumper: remembering the 1978–79 Alcorn State men’s basketball team, which was not invited to the NCAA Tournament despite finishing the regular season 27-0.

Podcast production and edit by Alexis Diao. Links compiled by Casey Butterly.

You can email us at hangup@slate.com.

Stefan Fatsis is the author of Word Freak and A Few Seconds of Panic, a regular guest on NPR's All Things Considered, and a panelist on Hang Up and Listen

Josh Levin is Slate's executive editor.

Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.

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