Slate’s Sports Podcast on the Biggest Troll in Mixed Martial Arts

Slate's sports podcast.
July 15 2013 5:18 PM

Hang Up and Listen: The I Bought a Hippo Edition

Slate’s sports podcast on whether baseball games are too slow, how Anderson Silva trolled UFC 162, and the dire state of highlight shows.

Listen to Hang Up and Listen with Josh Levin, Tim Marchman, and Mike Pesca by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

Become a fan of Hang Up and Listen on Facebook here:

Hang Up and Listen is brought to you by Stamps.com. Click on the radio microphone and enter HANGUP to get our $110 bonus offer.

Hang Up and Listen is also brought to you by Audible. Get a 30-day free trial by signing up at audiblepodcast.com/hangup. Our pick of the week is Titanic Thompson: The Man Who Bet on Everything by Kevin Cook.

In this week’s episode of Slate’s sports podcast Hang Up and Listen, Josh Levin and Mike Pesca welcome new Deadspin editor Tim Marchman to discuss the slow pace of baseball games, Chris Davis’ rise from struggling slugger to hitting 37 home runs by the All-Star break, and Tim Lincecum’s no-hitter. They also review Anderson Silva’s loss at UFC 162 and the long-time champ’s trolling tactics. Finally, they consider if the sports highlight show has outlived its usefulness.

Here are links to some of the articles and other items mentioned on the show:

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Hang Up and Listen’s weekly Vodka Drunkenskis:

Mike’s Vodka Drunkenski: In 1954, legendary sportswriter Red Smith wrote about the claim that a baseball is only in play for 12 minutes during a three-hour game.

Tim’s Vodka Drunkenski: Baron Davis confesses that he was abducted by aliens, though he hesitates to call it an abduction.

Josh’s Vodka Drunkenski: World champion Frisbee dog Ashley Whippet was called the “Professor Naismith, the Babe Ruth and the Michael Jordan of his sport all rolled into one.”

Podcast production and edit by Mike Vuolo. Our intern is Michael Gerber.

You can email us at hangup@slate.com.

Josh Levin is Slate's executive editor.

Tim Marchman is the deputy editor of Deadspin. You can follow him on Twitter.

Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.

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