Slate’s Sports Podcast on the Secrets of Super Bowl Gambling

Slate's sports podcast.
Jan. 28 2013 6:14 PM

Hang Up and Listen: The One Man’s Trash Talk Is Another Man’s Treasure Edition

Slate’s sports podcast on Super Bowl gambling, the fight-happy, lockout-shortened NHL season, and the ethics of trash talking.

Listen to "Hang Up and Listen" with Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

Become a fan of Hang Up and Listen on Facebook here:

Hang Up and Listen is brought to you by Stamps.com. Click on the radio microphone and enter HANGUP to get our $110 bonus offer.

Hang Up and Listen is also brought to you by Audible. Get a 30-day free trial by signing up at audiblepodcast.com/hangup. Our pick of the week is The Areas of My Expertise by John Hodgman.

In this week’s episode of Slate’s sports podcast Hang Up and Listen, Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca are joined by the Sporting News’ David Purdum to talk about football gambling and whether it’s true that Las Vegas took a beating this year. Next, they discuss the fight-happy start to the NHL’s shortened season with the New York Times Jeff Z. Klein. Finally, they examine the ethics of trash talking and the recent feud between Carmelo Anthony and Kevin Garnett.

Here are links to some of the articles and other items mentioned on the show:

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Hang Up and Listen’s weekly candy bars:

Mike’s candy bar: The Savage School of Physical Education made for some great sports headlines. Their athletes weren’t bad either.

Stefan’s candy bar: Everything you need to know about backwards running and world record holder Ferdie Adoboe.

Josh’s candy bar: The Lindenwood University shooting team has won nine straight collegiate Clay Target Championships.

Podcast production and edit by Mike Vuolo. Our intern is Eric Goldwein.

You can email us at hangup@slate.com.

Stefan Fatsis is the author of Word Freak and A Few Seconds of Panic, a regular guest on NPR's All Things Considered, and a panelist on Hang Up and Listen

Josh Levin is Slate's executive editor.

Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.

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