Why Syria, Why Now? Also, Showdowns Loom in U.S. Politics, and Lessons Learned Over Summer Vacation.

Slate's weekly political roundtable.
Aug. 30 2013 12:13 PM

The Terrifying, Looming, Touching-the-Void Awfulness Gabfest

Listen to Slate's show about why Obama might bomb Syria. Also, the fall forecast for U.S. politics, and the lessons of summer vacation.

Become a fan of the Political Gabfest on Facebook. We post to the Facebook page throughout the week, so keep the conversation going by joining us there. Or follow us @SlateGabfest!

To listen to the discussion, use the player below:

Live ‘Dear Prudence!’ Washington, D.C., Sept. 11, 7p.m. Join David as he questions Slate ‘Dear Prudence’ columnist Emily Yoffe about her most memorable letters. Tickets.

Live DoubleX Gabfest! Washington, D.C., Sept. 18, 7p.m. Tickets.

Live Culture Gabfest! Brooklyn, Sept. 24. Tickets.

This week’s Audible recommendation is A Little History of the World by E.H. Gombrich. Try Audible free for 30 days and get a free audiobook by visiting AudiblePodcast.com/Gabfest.

Advertisement

On this week’s Slate Political Gabfest, Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the President’s tentative plan to attack Syria in retaliation for the Assad government’s alleged use of chemical weapons. They also discuss the debt ceiling, immigration, and other challenges that confront Congress when it returns to Washington. Finally, they reflect on lessons learned during their summer vacations.

Here are some of the links and references mentioned during this week's show:

John chatters about Gavin Aung Than’s comic strip rendering of a 1990 Kenyon College commencement speech by Calvin and Hobbes cartoonist Bill Watterson.

Topic ideas for next week? You can tweet suggestions, links, and questions to @SlateGabfest. The email address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (Email may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.)

Podcast production by Andy Bowers. Links compiled by Jeff Friedrich.

Emily Bazelon was a Slate senior editor from 2005 to 2014. She is the author of Sticks and Stones.

John Dickerson is Slate's chief political correspondent and author of On Her Trail. Read his series on the presidency and on risk.

David Plotz is Slate's editor at large. He's the author of The Genius Factory and Good Book.

TODAY IN SLATE

Medical Examiner

Here’s Where We Stand With Ebola

Even experienced international disaster responders are shocked at how bad it’s gotten.

The U.S. Airstrikes on ISIS in Syria Will Probably Benefit America’s Other Enemies

Divestment Is Fine but Mostly Symbolic. There’s a Better Way for Universities to Fight Climate Change.

It’s Not Easy for Me, but I Stand With Emma Watson on Women’s Rights

It Is Very Stupid to Compare Hope Solo to Ray Rice

Building a Better Workplace

In Defense of HR

Startups and small businesses shouldn’t skip over a human resources department.

Why Are Lighter-Skinned Latinos and Asians More Likely to Vote Republican?

How Ted Cruz and Scott Brown Misunderstand What It Means to Be an American Citizen

  News & Politics
The World
Sept. 23 2014 10:55 AM This Isn’t the Syria Intervention Anyone Wanted
  Business
Business Insider
Sept. 23 2014 10:03 AM Watch Steve Jobs Tell Michael Dell, "We're Coming After You"
  Life
The Vault
Sept. 23 2014 10:24 AM How Bad Are Your Drinking Habits? An 18th-Century Temperance Thermometer Has the Verdict.
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 23 2014 11:13 AM Why Is This Mother in Prison for Helping Her Daughter Get an Abortion?
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus
Sept. 22 2014 1:52 PM Tell Us What You Think About Slate Plus Help us improve our new membership program.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 23 2014 9:42 AM Listen to the Surprising New Single From Kendrick Lamar
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 23 2014 10:51 AM Is Apple Picking a Fight With the U.S. Government? Not exactly.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 23 2014 11:00 AM Google CEO: Climate Change Deniers Are “Just Literally Lying”
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.