The Gabfest: Immigration Reform’s Path Through the House, Hillary Clinton’s Age Problem, and the Anniversary of Gettysburg

Slate's weekly political roundtable.
July 8 2013 2:05 PM

The “Is Hillary Too Old?” Gabfest

Listen to Slate's show about immigration reform’s path through the House, Hillary Clinton’s age, and the legacy of Gettysburg.

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This week’s Audible recommendation is World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, by Max Brooks. Try Audible free for 30 days and get a free audiobook by visiting AudiblePodcast.com/Gabfest.

Chicago Live Show: Wednesday, July 10, 7 p.m., at the Thorne Auditorium on the Chicago campus of Northwestern University. Tickets and additional information here. Now with special guest Peter Sagal, host of NPR’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me!

On this week’s Slate Political Gabfest, John Dickerson and David Plotz are joined by special guest Garance Franke-Ruta, senior editor at the Atlantic. They discuss immigration reform’s path through the House of Representatives, Hillary Clinton’s age, and the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Here are some of the links and references mentioned during this week's show:

John chatters about first ladies Obama and Bush, who met this week in Africa.

Garance chatters about Justices Elena Kagan and Antonin Scalia, unlikely hunting buddies.

David chatters about Ender’s Game, the movie. David also asks listeners to confirm whether Google has gotten worse. Weigh in at the Gabfest Facebook page.

Topic ideas for next week? You can tweet suggestions, links, and questions to @SlateGabfest. The email address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (Email may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.)

Podcast production by Mike Vuolo. Links compiled by Jeff Friedrich.

John Dickerson is Slate's chief political correspondent and author of On Her Trail. Read his series on the presidency and on risk.

David Plotz is Slate's editor at large. He's the author of The Genius Factory and Good Book.

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