The Political Gabfest for Nov. 11, 2010.

Slate's weekly political roundtable.
Nov. 11 2010 2:42 PM

The Michigan Live Gabfest

Listen to Slate's review of the week in politics.

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Listen to the Gabfest for Nov. 11 by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

And here's the question-and-answer session that followed:

Here are some of the links and references mentioned during this week's show:

Washington Post piece on how Obama needs to return his attention to the heartland.
David Brooks' New York Times column on the importance of the Midwest in American politics.
Video of President Obama's interview on 60 Minutes.
Talking Points Memo piece on the fiscal commission's draft report.
Full video of Matt Lauer's NBC interview with President Bush.
Slate piece on Bush nostalgia and a review of the former president's new book, Decision Points.
Slate piece on Flores-Villar v. United States, a case argued in front of the Supreme Court this week, questioning whether it's fair to treat fathers and mothers differently when determining American citizenship.

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David chatters on booing children. (Yes, David boos children.)
Emily chatters on this week's testimony from Elizabeth Smart, who was kept captive in Utah for nine months by Brian David Mitchell.
John chatters on his Slate piece on the remarkably efficient policing of Sarah Palin's Facebook page.

The e-mail address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (E-mail may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.)

Posted on Nov. 11 by John Griffith at 2:45 p.m.

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Slate Senior Editor Emily Bazelon, Chief Political Correspondent John Dickerson, and Editor David Plotz host the Gabfest weekly. 

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