Slate's Political Gabfest for Jan. 30.

Slate's weekly political roundtable.
Jan. 30 2009 11:25 AM

The Absurd and a Little Testy Gabfest

Listen to Slate's review of the week in politics.

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See all of Slate's inauguration coverage.

Listen to the Gabfest for Jan. 30 by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

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Get your 14-day free trial of Gabfest sponsor Audible.com, which includes a credit for one free audio book, here. This week's suggestion for an Audible book comes from David. It's On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin, read by evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins.

Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz talk politics. This week: the stimulus package, presidential drinking and legislative civility, and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act.

Here are links to some of the articles and other items mentioned in the show:

The financial stimulus package passed the House of Representatives in a vote along party lines. David says that's partly because the rump Republicans (those Republicans left after the 2008 election) are more conservative than the Republicans who lost their seats in November. The remaining Republicans don't want to be associated with the stimulus bill. Rather, they want to position themselves as fiscal conservatives.

Public opinion polls, meanwhile, indicate that the public wants bipartisanship in Washington.

John talks about a visit by members of Congress to the White House, where they were served appetizers and, more important, alcohol. He wonders whether having drinks together will break down some of the barriers between parties.

President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act into law this week. The measure allows victims of pay discrimination to file a complaint within 180 days of their last paycheck, rather than within 180 days of their first unfair paycheck. Emily says the measure is a thrilling development for those concerned with employment discrimination.