Kids and Internet safety, Danah Boyd’s It’s Complicated, and Scarlett Johansson New Yorker profile on the Double X Gabfest.

Why Do Men Write This Way About Scarlett Johansson?

Slate’s weekly women’s roundtable.
March 20 2014 8:34 AM

DoubleX Gabfest: The Stranger Danger Edition

Listen to Slate’s show about the Atlantic story on our safety obsession; Danah Boyd’s new book, It’s Complicated; and the New Yorker’s weird Scarlett Johansson profile.

Become a fan of DoubleX on Facebook. Leave us love letters and see what other listeners are saying about the Gabfest.

Listen to the DoubleX Gabfest by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

Advertisement

In this week’s Gabfest, DoubleX editor Hanna Rosin joins Slate senior editor Jessica Winter and New York magazine senior editor Noreen Malone to discuss the Atlantic story on our safety obsession; Danah Boyd’s new book, It’s Complicated; and the New Yorker’s weird Scarlett Johansson profile.

Other items discussed in the show:

DoubleX recommendations:

Jessica Winter recommends you read Lydia Davis and that you start with Samuel Johnson Is Indignant.

Hanna recommends Parallel Lives: Five Victorian Marriages by Phyllis Rose.

Noreen wants you to give a second chance to Broad City.

DoubleX plugs:

Loyal fans of Slate’s DoubleX, please remember to like us on our Facebook page. Send your emails to doublexgabfest@slate.com. Tell us what we should cover in the next edition

Noreen Malone is a senior editor at New York magazine.

Hanna Rosin is the founder of DoubleX and a writer for the Atlantic. She is also the author of The End of Men. Follow her on Twitter.

Jessica Winter is Slate’s features editor.

  Life
The History of American Slavery
Sept. 3 2015 11:17 AM Why They Fled Underground Railroad operator Sydney Howard Gay’s meticulous guestbook reveals how and why enslaved men and women risked everything to escape north.
  Slate Plus
The History of American Slavery
Sept. 3 2015 10:59 AM To Do No Harm? History of American Slavery, Episode 7: What modern medicine gained from slavery, and how slaveholders sought to legitimize their ideology through science.