Culture Gabfest: Literary Fiction vs. Genre Fiction, the Atavist, and the New York Times’ Vows Column

Slate's weekly roundtable.
May 30 2012 10:49 AM

The Culture Gabfest, “Who Cares Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?” Edition

Listen to Slate's show about literary vs. genre fiction, the mobile publishing platform the Atavist, and the New York Times’ Vows column.

PODCAST_culture-gabfest_click

Listen to Culture Gabfest No. 193 with Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

And join the lively conversation on the Culturefest Facebook page here:

Our sponsor of today’s show is Bloodman, the new thriller by Robert Pobi. Get your copy in Kindle edition, paperback or hardcover.

The Slate Culture Gabfest is coming to the Greene Space on May 31 to team up with Movies on the Radio’s David Garland. We’ll be talking about music and the movies. The show is sold out, but you can still hear the conversation at 7 p.m. on the live video webcast at www.wqxr.org/gabfest.

In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss Arthur Krystal’s New Yorker piece on the distinctions between genre fiction and literary fiction, and Lev Grossman’s response in Time. The Gabfesters then discuss the mobile publishing platform Atavist and the future of long-form journalism. Finally, they consider the role of the New York Times’ Weddings/Celebrations section and “Vows” column over the last 20 years in both culture and brunch sport.

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Here are some links to the things we discussed this week:

Endorsements:

Dana’s picks: BBC Radio 4’s podcast Shakespeare’s Restless World.
Julia’s pick: The game Cornhole.
Stephen’s picks: The movie Tommy Boy and the band Chairlift.

Outro: “Bruises" by Chairlift.

You can email us at culturefest@slate.com.

This podcast was produced by Mark Phillips. Our intern is Sally Tamarkin.

Follow us on the new Culturefest Twitter feed. And please Like the Culture Gabfest on Facebook.

Stephen Metcalf is Slate's critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.

Dana Stevens is Slate's movie critic.

Julia Turner is the editor in chief of Slate and a regular on Slate's Culture Gabfest podcast.

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