Corrections from the last week.

Slate's mistakes.
Aug. 26 2011 6:50 AM

Corrections

Red pen.

In an Aug. 25 "Future Tense" blog post, Torie Bosch misspelled Fast Company writer Neal Ungerleider's first name.

In the Aug. 25 "Moneybox," Annie Lowrey misstated the increase in dog thefts since last year as 32 percent. They have increased 49 percent.

In the Aug. 24 "Culture Gabfest," BayeuxTapestry was misspelled.

In an Aug. 24 "XX Factor" post, K.J. Dell'Antonia referred to Reactive Attachment Disorder as Radical Attachment Disorder.

An Aug. 23 "Explainer" incorrectly stated that an earthquake doesn't change the planet's speed of rotation. It does, but the effect is so small as to be insignificant. (Changes in atmospheric winds and ocean currents have a much greater effect.)

In an Aug. 23 "Explainer," Brian Palmer confused the Richter scale with the moment magnitude scale for measuring the size of an earthquake.

In the Aug. 23 "Twins," Jesse Bering misspelled Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen's surname.

In the Aug. 23 "Twins," Angela Tchou incorrectly stated that the first IVF child was born in 1982. That was the first in the United States. The first overall was born in 1978.

The Aug. 22 "Explainer" stated that rebels in Libya had taken three of Muammar Qaddafi's sons into custody on their way into Tripoli on Sunday. Later news reports cast doubt on this assertion, and the article was updated to reflect the subsequent reports.

In the Aug. 22 "Double X," the number 10,000 originally had an extra zero appended to it. Also, the final letter of Noa'a Shimoni's first name was incorrectly capitalized.

In the Aug. 19 "War Stories," Fred Kaplan originally said that the U.N. abbreviation R2P stood for "right to protect." It refers to the responsibility to protect.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our reader discussion forum "The Fray" or our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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