Slate’s mistakes for the week of July 20.

Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of July 20

Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of July 20

Slate's mistakes.
July 24 2015 4:01 AM

Corrections

Slate’s mistakes.

In a July 25 Brow Beat, Chris Wade misspelled the last name of Big Lebowski character Jesus Quintana.

In a July 24 Behold, Jordan G. Teicher misspelled Colombia.

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In a July 24 The Juice, Daniel Gross misstated that Felix Baumgartner jumped from a plane 24 miles above the Earth. He jumped from a helium balloon.

In a July 24 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misspelled the middle name of Lafayette, Louisiana, shooter John Russell Houser.

In a July 24 Slatest, Jeremy Stahl misstated that Hulk Hogan was secretly recorded having sex in 2012. The recording took place in 2008 and was publicized in 2012.

In a July 23 Bad Astronomy, Phil Plait misspelled Norman Chan’s last name.

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In a July 23 Outward, Mark Joseph Stern misidentified one of the customers whose personal information Melissa and Aaron Klein, owners of Sweet Cakes by Melissa in Oregon, published. The Kleins published the information of Rachel and Laurel, not Rachel and Melissa.

In a July 23 Slatest, Elliot Hannon misstated the age of the man whom police say shot multiple people at a Louisiana movie theater. He was 59, not 58.

In a July 23 War Stories, Fred Kaplan misspelled Marco Rubio’s first name. 

In a July 22 Moneybox blog post, Will Oremus misstated the year-over-year revenue increase in Apple's “Other Products” category as $850 billion. It was $850 million.

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Due to an editing error, the photo caption in a July 22 Outward misstated that it was from Tangier's Jamaa el Fna. Jamaa el Fna is in Marrakech.

In a July 22 Slatest, Miriam Krule misidentified the Ph.D. student who discovered the pages of the Quran as male. She is female. The post has been updated to include her name, Alba Fedeli.

In a July 22 Slatest, Beth Ethier misstated that Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Brian Encinia was placed on administrative leave following the death of Sandra Bland. Encinia was placed on administrative duty.

In a July 22 Users, Amanda Hess misidentified the film The Dark Knight Rises as The Dark Night Rises.

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In a July 21 Slatest, Elliot Hannon misstated that Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Brian Encinia was placed on administrative leave following the death of Sandra Bland. Encinia was placed on administrative duty.

Due to an editing error, a July 20 XX Factor misstated that a New York Times article about Bill Cosby was published on July 19. It was published on July 18.

In a July 19 Slatest, Daniel Politi misspelled Pelham, North Carolina.

In a July 17 Brow Beat, Marissa Visci misstated that the wristbands used during Taylor Swift’s 1989 tour were fitted with RFID chips. They were not.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you’ve seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.