Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 21

Slate's mistakes.
Oct. 25 2013 4:45 AM

Corrections

Slate’s mistakes.

In an Oct. 24 Politics, Emma Roller referred to the state-subsidized health care program for low-income people as Medicare. It's Medicaid.

In an Oct. 24 Weigel blog post, David Weigel misspelled Dan Aykroyd’s last name.

In an Oct. 23 Future Tense blog post, Will Oremus misspelled Encyclopaedia Britannica.

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In an Oct. 23 Outward blog post, June Thomas misspelled Mare Winningham's last name.

Due to an editing error in an Oct. 22, 2013 Double X,  Anna Holmes' views on dating were mischaracterized. She rejects an obsession with heterosexual coupling, not heterosexual coupling in general.  

In an Oct. 22 Future Tense blog post, Will Oremus misstated that Microsoft's Surface 2 weighed twice as much as the new iPad. The business-focused Surface Pro 2 weighs nearly 2 pounds; the Surface 2 weighs a shade under 1.5.

In an Oct. 22 Weigel blog post, David Weigel misstated Idaho state Sen. Russ Fulcher’s first name as Rich.

In an Oct. 21 Culturebox, Peter Malamud Smith misspelled the name of the 12 Years a Slave character Patsey.

In an Oct. 21 Kids, Melinda Wenner Moyer misstated that middle seats in cars do not have LATCH anchors. Most do not, but some do. 

In an Oct. 21 Weigel blog post, David Weigel misspelled West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey's last name.

In an Oct. 18 Brow Beat blog post, Aisha Harris misstated that Harriet Jacobs married Samuel Sawyer. The two were consensual lovers, but never married.

In an Oct. 17 Human Genome, Jessica Wapner wrote that cigarette smoking is the only factor whose cancer-causing properties are beyond debate. Several other environmental exposures are known carcinogens, including ultraviolet light exposure and a form of asbestos.

In an Oct. 17 Lexicon Valley blog post, Mark Liberman misidentified a niemanstoryboard.org series as "Storyboard." It's called "Annotation Tuesday!"

In an Oct. 11 Books, Seth Stevenson misstated that Donald Fagen's wife's son committed suicide in July 2012. The suicide occurred in July 2009. The sentence has been removed.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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