Slate’s Mistakes for the Week of Aug. 5

Slate's mistakes.
Aug. 9 2013 4:45 AM

Corrections

Slate’s mistakes.

Red pen,Red Pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.,gabriela insuratelu

In an Aug. 9 Brow Beat blog post, June Thomas misspelled Asperger syndrome.

Due to a captioning error by Getty Images, the lead photo in an Aug. 9 Transportation was labeled as a scale model of the Skylon plane. It is a scale model of the SABRE engine.

Due to a production error in an Aug. 8 Moneybox, Exxon Mobil was misspelled. 

In an Aug. 8 Technology, Farhad Manjoo misidentified HVF’s Mike Huang as a product manager. He is a co-founder of the company. He also described the Glow app as the company's first product. It is the second. 

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In an Aug. 7 Science, Daniel Engber misspelled Google co-founder Sergey Brin’s first name.

In an Aug. 7 TV, Willa Paskin misstated the Broadchurch character Alec Hardy's rank. He is a detective inspector, not a detective sergeant.

In an Aug. 6 Moneybox, Jane Black stated that soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks account for 58 percent of beverages purchased with SNAP benefits. They actually account for 58 percent of beverages purchased by households receiving SNAP benefits.

In an Aug. 6 Weigel blog post, David Weigel misspelled Robert Pittenger’s name.

In a Aug. 5 Moneybox blog post, Matthew Yglesias misspelled Taco Bell CEO Greg Creed’s first name.

In an Aug. 5 XX Factor blog post, Mark Joseph Stern wrote that 14 states still have anti-sodomy laws on the books. Only 13 do. He also wrote that four states, including Montana, explicitly outlaw consensual sex between people of the same sex. Only three states do, and Montana is no longer one of them.

In an Aug. 4 Bad Astronomy blog post, Phil Plait identified the sculptor of metal statues at Borrego Springs as Dennis Avery. Avery was the philanthropist who owned the land, and Ricardo Breceda was the sculptor.

In an Aug. 2 Politics, David Weigel wrote that a Democratic presidential candidate had not won the state of Montana since 1964. Bill Clinton won Montana in 1992.

In a July 13 Moneybox blog post, Matthew Yglesias misstated that Virginia’s constitution limits governors to a single year. In Virginia, governors are limited to a single four-year term, but multiple four-year terms are permitted as long as they are not consecutive.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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