Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Sept. 3, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
Sept. 7 2012 3:15 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In a Sept. 7 "Politics," David Weigel referred to John McCormack as a reporter for the Washington Times. He writes for the Weekly Standard.

In a Sept. 6 “Sports Nut” NFL dialogue entry, Tom Scocca originally misstated the year in which Robert Tisch was recruited to help Baltimore land an NFL team. It was 1991, not 1993.

In a Sept. 6 "Politics," John Dickerson misspelled the last name of Tony Coelho.

In a Sept. 5 "DoubleX," Amanda Schaffer misstated the name of Seth Mnookin's book The Panic Virus.

In a Sept. 4 "Future Tense" blog post, Will Oremus mistakenly identified English author Neil Gaiman by his middle name, Richard.

In the Sept. 4 "Reckoning," Michael Moran referred to Warren G. Harding's 1924 presidential race. Harding ran for president—and won—in 1920 but was dead by 1924.

In the Sept. 3 “Reckoning,” Michael Moran misspelled the Glass-Steagall Act.

In an Aug. 29 "Medical Examiner," Bill Gifford misstated the name of Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

In an Aug. 9 "XX Factor" post, Katy Waldman misidentified Georgia Institute of Technology professor Jennifer Carson Marr as Jennifer Mason Carr.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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