Top Gun Director Leaps to His Death from Bridge

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
Aug. 20 2012 8:24 AM

Top Gun Director Tony Scott Leaps to His Death from Bridge

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Tony Scott, seen here with his wife Donna W. Scott in 2010, died Sunday at the age of 68.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for BAFTA Los Angeles.

Some sad news from California overnight: Tony Scott, the Hollywood director that gave us Top Gun and the Days of Thunder, among countless other films, died Sunday after jumping from a Los Angeles County bridge.

Josh Voorhees Josh Voorhees

Josh Voorhees is a Slate senior writer. He lives in Iowa City. 

Police have not officially declared his death a suicide, but all signs point toward that conclusion. The Los Angeles Times reports that police found a suicide note in the 68-year-old's office, although the letter's exact contents have not yet been released.

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The Associated Press with the background:

The British-born Scott, who lived in Beverly Hills, was producer and director Ridley Scott's younger brother. Distinct visual styles mark both siblings' films—Ridley Scott mastering the creation of entire worlds with such films as "Gladiator," "Blade Runner," "Alien" and this year's "Prometheus," Tony Scott known for hyper-kinetic action and editing on such films as his most recent, the runaway train thriller "Unstoppable," starring regular collaborator Denzel Washington.
Scott was a thrill-seeker himself in his personal life, an avid rock climber who also liked driving fast cars and motorcycles. Still, filmmaking was his real thrill.

Scott had recently completed filming on Out of the Furnace, a drama about an ex-con he was producing that stars Christian Bale. He was also involved in a handful of other films currently in various stages of production, including Ion and Stoker, the latter of which is currently slated for a March release.

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