What We Know, Sort of Know, and Will Never Know About the Future of Mad Men

Brow Beat
Slate's Culture Blog
Jan. 23 2013 3:07 PM

What We Know, Sort of Know, and Will Never Know About Mad Men, Season 6

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Don Draper (Jon Hamm) in Mad Men

Photograph by Michael Yarish.

It’s been over six months since we last saw Don Draper and his colleagues and acquaintances facing excruciating tests of character in the macabre fifth season of Mad Men. With the exception of a few leaked photos here and there, series creator Matthew Weiner has generally remained mum about what’s in store for the show. Until now: With Season 6 around the corner, Weiner has opened up in extraordinary fashion, with a series of stunning revelations about what’s left for the series.

Aisha Harris Aisha Harris

Aisha Harris is a Slate staff writer.

Season 6 will premiere on April 7.
As in Season 5, the premiere will be two hours long.

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The show will still be on AMC.
We’re pretty sure.

This is the second-to-last season of Mad Men.
I’m going to confirm that,” Weiner told The Daily Beast.

Weiner knows Pete Campbell really well.
“I know the character of Pete very well and I don’t see Peter Campbell as someone who would ever commit suicide,” Weiner says. So Vincent Kartheiser will probably remain part of the cast for the duration of Season 6 (though Weiner doesn’t say whether he’s seen Pete around lately). And Elisabeth Moss is returning to the show, too, despite Peggy’s exit from Sterling Cooper Draper Price. “I never said to anyone that Elisabeth was leaving the show,” Weiner says. “I just said that the character was moving on and you’ll have to watch.”

Mad Men will not engage in time travel or employ a Memento-style backwards narrative (we think).
It will advance in time, as it does,” Weiner says of Season 6, with bracing candor. “I won’t say how long,” he added.

It will be zeitgeist-y.
Weiner believes that Season 5 reflected the “anxiety” and “sense of social disorder” many people felt during 2012, and that “the last six months have not been that different.”

It will deal with the “loss of something.”
More specifically, “the loss of our—now I’m being super-vague about it,” Weiner explains. “I’m not prepared to talk about it.”

A mysterious force prevents Weiner from revealing details about Peggy’s office.
When asked whether there is a set built for Cutler Gleason and Chaough, where Peggy went to work, Weiner replied, “Can’t tell you.” Similarly, when asked about Don’s seemingly deteriorating relationship with Megan, Weiner replied, “I can’t tell you.”

Don and Megan might go to Hawaii.
And Don might read Dante there. But Weiner won’t say.

This is not a teaser game.”
Not at all.