Disaster relief for Harvey, why Colin Kaepernick doesn’t have a job, and the alt-right internet, in Slate’s daily newsletter.

Disaster Relief, Kaepernick’s Job, and the Internet of Hate

Disaster Relief, Kaepernick’s Job, and the Internet of Hate

Sharp takes on big stories.
Aug. 31 2017 6:13 PM

The Angle: Alt-Net Edition

Slate’s daily newsletter on disaster relief, Kaepernick’s job, and the internet of hate.

Solidarity-With-Charlottesville-Rallies-Are-Held-Across-The-Country-In-Wake-Of-Death-After-Alt-Right-Rally-Last-Week
No home in America, but maybe a home on the Internet.

Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Where hate will go: As various gatekeepers of the internet have begun to deny alt-right groups their services, those groups have started to build their own internet, April Glaser reports. They swear they just want to be able to speak freely! They swear!

Rebecca Onion Rebecca Onion

Rebecca Onion is a Slate staff writer and the author of Innocent Experiments

Inconsistent: The GOP swings back and forth in voting for federal disaster relief, depending on whether the disaster happens in a red state. That’s because of self-interest, Jamelle Bouie argues, but also because Republicans simply don’t seem to believe in helping those hurt by such “acts of God.”

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No density: “Houston flooded because it's zoned so poorly” is the dominant narrative of most reporting on Hurricane Harvey. It’s a little bit more complicated than that, Henry Grabar argues. “Better zoning” (as people who value urban density would define it) might not have made any difference at all.

Still no job: Josh Levin takes a good look at the rationales of NFL execs explaining why they won’t employ Colin Kaepernick and finds a bounty of coded racism.

For fun: Colbert’s alter egos for the Trumpies.

Good old spying pixie,

Rebecca