The Anti-Bristol Party

The Anti-Bristol Party

The Anti-Bristol Party

Weigel
Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Nov. 23 2010 8:36 AM

The Anti-Bristol Party

Last night I walked across the street from my office and met up with a friend who'd just lost his job. We settled in the quieter room of a bar, but as we sat, more and more twenty-something and thirty-something professional types moved in, talking audibly about politics. One of these people walked over to us after "Wheel of Fortune" ended, explaining what was up.

"We're having a vote-against-Bristol party," said Jim McBride , the man behind the event. "In about half an hour we're going to put Dancing With the Stars on and vote for Jennifer Grey."

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for the Washington Post. 

Advertisement

McBride explained that he was with a pro-"Obama movement" group, in the process of rebranding itself as a group of young progressives. This filled me with cliched ideas about what it meant that progressives, in the middle of a lame duck session of Congress run by Democrats, were training their fire on the Palin family's attempt to earn something or other from a reality show whose ejected contestants included faded R&B stars and a man on an MTV show most famous for pulling up his shirt to reveal his abdominal muscles. But, like I said -- cliched. Who cared?

The local media cared. On the way out, a local news channel interviewed McBride and another anti-Bristol shock trooper about their project/publicity stunt. McBride explained that he had already voted for Grey via text message, three times. "I think that merit should win," he said. "Merit didn't win in the midterms; Democrats didn't credit for everything they did."

I left the bar, thinking that Bristolmania had surely just peaked. Then I read this .

Fifty-four percent of Americans think Sarah Palin's daughter Bristol is one of the finalists on ABC's competition series "Dancing With the Stars" because of large-scale voting by viewers who support her mother, according to a poll conducted by The Washington Post and ABC News.

 

David Weigel is a reporter for the Washington Post.