When "Anxiety" Passed "Shame": A History of Turning Points in American English Word Usage, Courtesy of Google

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Dec. 17 2010 10:28 PM

When "Anxiety" Passed "Shame": A History of Turning Points in American English Word Usage, Courtesy of Google

Here are more findings from Google's word-frequency data , in the order they occurred:

Late 1902 : "concrete" passes "marble."

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Early 1924 : "airplane" passes "steamship."

Spring of 1936 : "Chicago" passes "Boston."

Spring of 1939 : "boring" passes "thrilling."

1941 : "abortion" passes "orphan."

Winter or spring of 1942 : "anxiety" passes "shame."

1943 : "sexy" passes "brainy."

Spring of 1963 , "bathroom" passes "parlor."

Spring of 1964 : "freeway" passes "turnpike."

Late autumn of 1967 : "student" passes "teacher."

Late summer of 1968 : "orgasm" passes "chastity."

Summer of 1970 : "feelings" passes "duty."

Winter or spring of 1972 : "saxophone" passes "bassoon."

Winter of 1978 : "fun" passes "honest."

Spring of 1982 : "Doberman" passes "bloodhound."

Spring of 1982 : "Japan" passes "China."

Winter of 1992 : "jeans" passes "trousers."

Spring of 1996 : "China" passes "Japan."

Winter of 2001 : "latte" passes "lager."

Tom Scocca is the managing editor of Deadspin and the author of Beijing Welcomes You: Unveiling the Capital City of the Future.