The best looks and trends from the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show.

All the Best Looks From the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show

All the Best Looks From the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show

The XX Factor
What Women Really Think
Aug. 28 2017 1:36 PM

All the Best Looks From the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show

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Pinkies are up, hips are out, and the smize is heart-stopping—this model at the Concealed Carry Fashion Show on Friday is ready for a gunfight.

Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

At the National Rifle Association’s Carry Guard Expo in Milwaukee this weekend, firearm fanatics attended workshops that taught them how to protect themselves from “today’s unprecedented violence and global threat,” employ jiujitsu moves to supplement the bullets they put in people’s bodies, and use flashlights.

Christina Cauterucci Christina Cauterucci

Christina Cauterucci is a Slate staff writer.

They also got a tastemaker-curated peek at fall fashion trends in hiding deadly weapons on the human body. At the organization’s first Concealed Carry Fashion Show, models showed off ready-to-wear designs from a bunch of up-and-coming fashion houses you’ve never heard of, including Man-PACK, Packin’ Neat, and Lady Conceal. Here, we’ve collected some of the most notable designs from the show, coming soon to your local duel.

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For a higher-end consumer who likes to protect her privileged class standing with hollow-points, a white leather handbag provides a touch of class. The shoulder strap chain symbolizes the shackles of oppression that keep Second Amendment advocates from bringing their weapons anywhere they damn please.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

WERQ! A holster worn under a safari-inspired shirt does double duty, cinching in belly fat while preparing the wearer for life-threatening encounters en route to the drug store or dentist.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

When “I’d like to speak to your manager” comes with the threat of violent death.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

You’ve probably heard that skinny jeans are out, but did you know the wider-leg trend started with gun owners who wanted a little more room for their calf holsters?

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

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Quilted totes that camouflage both pumpkin-spice spills and lethal weapons: in for fall!

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Last week, you swore you’d kill your barre instructor if she told you to do one more “little pulse.” Now, with a pistol under your leggings, you can!

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

The NRA should be applauded for spotlighting “real” bodies, like that of this dollar-store Fabio. (Some fashion critics have disagreed, saying the show needed more “sex appeal,” “babes,” and “himbos.”)

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

This model committed to a matchy-matchy look with a manicure in the same “sea to shining sea” blue as her fake gun. The show’s use of training guns did not inspire particular confidence in the safety of these holsters, but the saturated color provided visual interest.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

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A shirt with quick-release snaps is essential for those who keep their guns in their cleavage.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Join in the feminist T-shirt trend with a shirt that screams “the only good Women’s March is the one to the firing range!” Then, channel fashion icon Plaxico Burress by tucking a very safe object into your waistband.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

The Anna Wintour of the NRA looks unimpressed, but his famously chilly expression could belie internal fits of ecstasy at the sight of a truly transcendent lewk.

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images