Fox News Calls Ruth Bader Ginsburg an Ignorant Misandrist

What Women Really Think
Aug. 1 2014 12:52 PM

Fox News Calls Ruth Bader Ginsburg an Ignorant Misandrist

106134430-justice-ruth-bader-ginsburg-attends-california-first
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Katie Couric interviewed Ruth Bader Ginsburg for Yahoo News this week, and naturally, much of the interview covered Ginsburg's strongly dissenting opinion on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby. Couric noted that the justices who supported the decision—which allowed corporations to bar employees from using their health insurance plans to pay for contraception on the grounds of the corporations' religious beliefs—were all men. She asked Ginsburg whether "the five male justices truly understood the ramifications of their decision" and whether they might have "a bit of a blind spot" when it comes to women's health needs. Ginsburg agreed, noting the universal nature of contraception use among women

Ginsburg’s comments inspired comical levels of umbrage-taking on The Five on Fox News, where Andrea Tantaros worked herself into full-blown "misandry!" mode. "Isn't she sort of saying, 'Keep men away from this court?' " she complained. "I get it. She's a fan of birth control, but she is an enemy to the Bill of Rights." 

Advertisement

"Can you imagine if Justice Scalia would say the same thing about the women on the court, that they have a blind spot? In other words, they're not reasonable?" Tantaros said. That is an interesting hypothetical, given that, in his majority opinion, Justice Samuel Alito specifically shut down the possibility that any other kind of health care would be affected by this ruling. He's the one who singled out contraception as a lesser form of health care, not Ginsburg. But hey, maybe the court will soon rule on whether male-only health care counts as health care enough to be protected as health care, and Tantaros will see her theory put to the test. I'm sure that will happen any day now. 

After the panel raced to determined that men are the real victims here, Eric Bolling sprinted for the gold in Olympic mansplaining. "This is a Supreme Court justice lumping all contraceptives together," he exclaimed in horror, even though all contraceptives do work on the principle of preventing conception, as the name indicates. "Hobby Lobby was about four out of 20 potential contraceptives that they disagreed with. It's unbelievable. If she's making the decision on something so important, wouldn't you think she would have a working knowledge of what it's really about?" 

That "four out of 20" talking point is popular on the right, and it's also false. Hobby Lobby sued over four kinds of birth control, but the Supreme Court issued a clarification the day after their ruling to make it clear that their decision covered all forms of contraception to which an employer might object. Later, the court granted an emergency injunction to an employer arguing that "religious liberty" grants the employer the right to block an employee’s ability to get all contraception coverage directly from her insurance company by refusing to sign the paperwork that sets her free. So yes, Ginsburg should have working knowledge of the case. Luckily, hers is in much better shape than Eric Bolling's. 

Amanda Marcotte is a Brooklyn-based writer and DoubleX contributor. She also writes regularly for the Daily Beast, AlterNet, and USA Today. Follow her on Twitter.

TODAY IN SLATE

Doublex

Crying Rape

False rape accusations exist, and they are a serious problem.

Scotland Is Just the Beginning. Expect More Political Earthquakes in Europe.

No, New York Times, Shonda Rhimes Is Not an “Angry Black Woman” 

Brow Beat
Sept. 19 2014 1:39 PM Shonda Rhimes Is Not an “Angry Black Woman,” New York Times. Neither Are Her Characters.

The Music Industry Is Ignoring Some of the Best Black Women Singing R&B

How Will You Carry Around Your Huge New iPhone? Apple Pants!

Medical Examiner

The Most Terrifying Thing About Ebola 

The disease threatens humanity by preying on humanity.

Television

The Other Huxtable Effect

Thirty years ago, The Cosby Show gave us one of TV’s great feminists.

There’s a Way to Keep Ex-Cons Out of Prison That Pays for Itself. Why Don’t More States Use It?

Why Men Can Never Remember Anything

The XX Factor
Sept. 19 2014 1:11 PM Why Men Can Never Remember Anything
Behold
Sept. 19 2014 11:33 AM An Up-Close Look at the U.S.–Mexico Border
  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 19 2014 5:19 PM Washington's Acting Roles
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 19 2014 3:24 PM Why Innovators Hate MBAs
  Life
Inside Higher Ed
Sept. 19 2014 1:34 PM Empty Seats, Fewer Donors? College football isn’t attracting the audience it used to.
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 19 2014 4:58 PM Steubenville Gets the Lifetime Treatment (And a Cheerleader Erupts Into Flames)
  Slate Plus
Slate Picks
Sept. 19 2014 12:00 PM What Happened at Slate This Week? The Slatest editor tells us to read well-informed skepticism, media criticism, and more.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 19 2014 4:48 PM You Should Be Listening to Sbtrkt
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 19 2014 5:03 PM White House Chief Information Officer Will Run U.S. Ebola Response
  Health & Science
Medical Examiner
Sept. 19 2014 5:09 PM Did America Get Fat by Drinking Diet Soda?   A high-profile study points the finger at artificial sweeteners.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.