My Daughter Was Dress-Coded for Wearing Shorts

What Women Really Think
June 9 2014 12:28 PM

My Daughter Was Dress-Coded for Wearing Shorts

dress_code1
The outfit that got my daughter in trouble.

Courtesy of Jennifer Weiss-Wolf

I took this photo in May 2012 of my then-sixth-grade daughter in the lobby of her Maplewood, New Jersey, school. She had a solo in her chorus concert that evening and wanted a keepsake of the day. In my eye, she is the vision of preteen enthusiasm and confidence.

School officials deemed otherwise. Her shorts violated the “fingertip” rule of the South Orange-Maplewood School District—whereby shorts or skirts must “reach to the fingertips of the extended arm”—now notorious in middle school vernacular. Shortly after I snapped the shot, she was pulled from class and sent to detention, where she was ordered to don a Hester Prynne–style “shirt of shame” for the rest of the school day—an oversized men’s shirt that covered her from neck to shins.

Advertisement

Every spring, the dress code wars arise anew. Parents get a slew of e-blasts from school administrators, like this one from the principal of a nearby middle school: “Dress code continues to be a concern, specifically with our female students.” There is talk about clothes interfering with establishing and maintaining a “learning environment”— prompting the question of whose “learning environment” is being prioritized and at whose expense. Scripted morning announcements at my daughter's school include daily reminders, “to the young ladies,” about the importance of wearing appropriate attire.

Similar dress code stories swirl around the Internet—from Evanston, Illinois, where a ban on leggings sparked community outrage (and the best protester sign yet: “Are my pants lowering your test scores?”), to Montreal, where a student was suspended for protesting her school’s practice of lining up girls to assess the length of their shorts and the width of their tank-top straps. And it isn’t just secondary schools. A sign posted on the door of the nursing school at the University of Texas lists off-limits attire for women that otherwise “distract[s] from the learning environment.” (Jezebel reports that the sign has now been removed.) And in Utah, a high school digitally altered yearbook photos to cover up girls’ shoulders and other body parts.

After my daughter was punished on that spring day two years ago, I’ve struggled with this issue. I’ve vetoed bat mitzvah dresses I deemed too short, camisoles too low-cut. It is a fine line: I want her to feel comfortable in her skin. But parenting teenagers is all about the gray areas; our discussions about dress and self-awareness leave room for nuance. In rejecting an outfit, I have never, ever communicated to my child that her dress was a “distraction” to others or that she bore responsibility if someone reacted in any way—favorably, rudely, distracted, or otherwise—to her body. That schools are passing on this very message to her and other female students—and simultaneously communicating to boys that their learning environment is being compromised by the sight of girls' limbs or cleavage—is unhealthy and unsound at best, illegal at worst.

The debate has taken on new meaning in the aftermath of the Santa Barbara rampage—as national attention has shifted to how the misogyny embedded in our culture results in violence against women, in numbers that are shocking. The kids are wise to it, too. Some have started attaching the hashtag #YesAllWomen to Instagram photos and statements representing how they feel about the way their school singles out girls for attention, punishment, and, yes, blame. Another rallying cry: #Iammorethanadistraction. Those hashtags give me hope that our girls will not so easily be shamed—that they get what’s going on—but it’s up to us parents to stand up to school administrators, to e-blast them right back.

dress_code2

Courtesy of Rebecca Wolf

My daughter was punished for showing too much of her (gasp!) legs. Her school is normalizing the notion that girls’ bodies are distractions. That girls bear responsibility for boys’ reactions to their bodies. That boys have thoughts that are inherently impure and will lead to misconduct. The school’s chosen mode of punishment is disrupting girls’ educational experiences and quite possibly hindering their legal right to an education. The message and actions perpetuated by gender-biased implementation of school dress codes—the blaming and shaming of our girls—has got to stop.

Jennifer Weiss-Wolf is director of special projects at the Brennan Center for Justice. A parent of three teenagers, she lives in Maplewood, New Jersey.

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

Talking White

Black people’s disdain for “proper English” and academic achievement is a myth.

The Secret Service’s Big Problems Were Reported Last Year. Nobody Cared.

Tattoo Parlors Have Become a Great Investment

Natasha Lyonne Is Coming to the Live Culture Gabfest. Are You?

A Jaw-Dropping Political Ad Aimed at Young Women, Apparently

The XX Factor
Oct. 1 2014 4:05 PM Today in GOP Outreach to Women: You Broads Like Wedding Dresses, Right?
Crime

Operation Backbone

How White Boy Rick, a legendary Detroit cocaine dealer, helped the FBI uncover brazen police corruption.

Music

How Even an Old Hipster Can Age Gracefully

On their new albums, Leonard Cohen, Robert Plant, and Loudon Wainwright III show three ways.

Hong Kong’s Protesters Are Ridiculously Polite. That’s What Scares Beijing So Much.

This Gargantuan Wind Farm in Wyoming Would Be the Hoover Dam of the 21st Century

Moneybox
Oct. 1 2014 8:34 AM This Gargantuan Wind Farm in Wyoming Would Be the Hoover Dam of the 21st Century To undertake a massively ambitious energy project, you don’t need the government anymore.
  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 2 2014 11:01 AM It Wasn’t a Secret A 2013 inspector general report detailed all of the Secret Service’s problems. Nobody cared.
  Business
Business Insider
Oct. 2 2014 11:16 AM Some McDonald's Monopoly Properties Matter More
  Life
The Vault
Oct. 2 2014 11:07 AM Mapping 1890 Manhattan's Crazy-Quilt of Immigrant Neighborhoods
  Double X
Doublex
Oct. 2 2014 11:34 AM Alabama’s Insane New Abortion Law Putting teenage girls on trial may finally be too much for the Supreme Court.
  Slate Plus
Behind the Scenes
Oct. 1 2014 3:24 PM Revelry (and Business) at Mohonk Photos and highlights from Slate’s annual retreat.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Oct. 2 2014 11:35 AM Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar’s New Video Is Somehow Both Creepy and Joyful
  Technology
Future Tense
Oct. 2 2014 11:41 AM Dropbox Recruiting Video Features Puppets and Data Privacy
  Health & Science
Medical Examiner
Oct. 2 2014 9:49 AM In Medicine We Trust Should we worry that so many of the doctors treating Ebola in Africa are missionaries?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 1 2014 5:19 PM Bunt-a-Palooza! How bad was the Kansas City Royals’ bunt-all-the-time strategy in the American League wild-card game?