Check Out Our New Commenting System!

The XX Factor
What Women Really Think
Oct. 7 2010 2:16 PM

Check Out Our New Commenting System!

We're pleased to announce that the XX Factor has a brand new commenting system from the developer JS-Kit, called Echo. Regular Slate readers will recognize the friendly orange boxes now affixed to our blog posts. Echo is replacing the comment system we had from when we were a standalone site. It should fix our unfortunate spam problem and make commenting much, much easier for our lovely readers. We know that commenting has been something of a headache in the past, and we are very happy to finally have a solution. Here's an explanation of how the new system works, from Slate editor David Plotz :

At the bottom of this page...you see two bright orange buttons. One lists the number of comments made about the article. The other invites you to add your own comment. If you click on the number of comments button, you'll be taken to the bottom of the page, where you can read through all the comments made by fellow readers. If you click on the "Add Yours" button, you'll be taken to a box, also at the bottom of the page where you can submit your comment after signing in. You can log in (via the "From" box) using your pre-existing Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, or FriendFeed accounts. If you don't have any of those accounts, or don't want to use them, you can register for a JS-Kit account and log in that way, too.
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Read more about our commenting system here . If you have any questions or problems logging in, please contact slatecomments@gmail.com . We have always thought of our blog posts here as part of a conversation, and we are truly thrilled that this new system will make the user experience much better-you all are a pivotal part of the discussions we have here.

Jessica Grose is a frequent Slate contributor and the author of the novel Sad Desk Salad. Follow her on Twitter.

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