Recession Briefing 8.13

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What Women Really Think
Aug. 13 2009 10:42 AM

Recession Briefing 8.13

JetBlue is planning to offer an "all-you-can-jet" pass for $599 in which passengers can book an unlimited amount of flights within a one-month span. ( CNN/Money )

The Federal Reserve says the recession looks to be coming to a close , and so it’s starting to return to business as usual. ( NY Times )

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The French and German economies both grew by 0.3% between April and June, bringing to an end year-long recessions in Europe’s largest economies. ( BBC )

Florida’s gator hunters are hurting as demand for high-end alligator skin purses, wallets, and belts has slackened due to the recession. ( Tampa Tribune )

Should a college pay when a grad can’t find a job? Monroe College should, writes Mark Gimein . ( The Big Money )

When it comes to the "Cash for Clunkers" program’s twin goals of stimulating the economy and reducing emissions, the results, many say, are mixed. ( U.S. News & World Report )

Once unabashedly focused on the perks of wealth and fame, a spate of new "chick lit" is tackling the recession and its attendant woes. ( New York Times )

Anxious workplace investors are easing back into their 401(k) plans, and many companies that have slashed 401(k) benefits plan to reverse those cuts within the next six months. ( Wall Street Journal )

Debit card use was growing rapidly before the economy tanked, but the recession appears to have made them the preferred form of plastic. ( Associated Press )

Even as the ranks of unemployed and underemployed have grown, career counselors, therapists and other experts say a certain segment is determined to suffer in silence , keeping details of job losses and financial pressure secret from all but close family and friends. ( Washington Post )

Median home prices fell a record 15.6% during the three months ended June 30, compared to the same period in 2008. ( CNN/Money )

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