Honey, Can I Please See My Mistress

Honey, Can I Please See My Mistress

Honey, Can I Please See My Mistress

The XX Factor
What Women Really Think
July 1 2009 4:01 PM

Honey, Can I Please See My Mistress

Hanna , perhaps the most enduring lesson of the Mark Sanford unraveling is that when your marriage falls apart, don't call in the AP reporters. I generally side with Ruth Marcus and have been pro-Jenny Sanford. But the danger in claiming the moral high ground is that the air starts to get thin, and the lack of oxygen makes you say stupid things. Like Jenny's offering far too many details about her husband's behavior. (I do however, like imagining the discussions in which Mark asks Jenny's permission to go to Buenos Aires to get laid.)

But in order to retain the public's sympathy, Jenny should stop talking. And how about skipping the references to Job ? Jenny Sanford is a wealthy woman with four healthy sons and an adolescent for a husband. That last fact is painful, but doesn't put her in Job territory. Author Christina Nehring, in her defense of being crazy in love , writes that she has "been derailed by love, hospitalized by love, flung around five continents ..." Mark Sanford must be a fan of the book. Derailed-check; flung around five continents- check; hospitalized-well, if he doesn't stop talking, I predict the next stop on his "journey" will be Belleview.

Emily Yoffe is a contributing editor at the Atlantic.