Opening Act: Midlife Crisis

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
May 22 2013 8:36 AM

Opening Act: Midlife Crisis

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People pose for photographs next to the plaque outside the Capitol Hill offices of former Rep. Anthony Weiner after he announced his resignation from Congress on June 17, 2011 in Washington, DC.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Anthony Weiner begins his campaign to let New Yorkers resuscitate his ego.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

Phil Klein offers a theory of why Republicans won't/can't overreach on Obama scandals. One flaw I see: the Clinton scandals were directly tied to Bill Clinton himself. Monica Lewinsky didn't hook up with an IRS administrator; she hooked up with the big guy. The search for a "cover-up" started from the crime scene. The quest to bring down Obama right now is more deductive.

Stephanie Mencimer shreds one Tea Party activist's claim that he was unjustly targeted by the IRS. It was Mencimer, remember, who had some fun with Frank VanderSloot's business practices after the health products tycoon donated $1 million to a Romney Super PAC. Only after all that did VanderSloot start talking about the government cracking down on him.

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Jon Cornyn takes point on the Tea Party campaign to sue the IRS.

Josh Rogin reports on the Senate's moves toward arming Syrian rebels.

The 3-D food printer is on its way.

And Wolf Blitzer is a genius.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter.