A Girl Who Dated Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Calls Him A "Hands-y Teenaged Boy"

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
May 3 2013 8:35 AM

Opening Act: Hands-y Teenaged Boy

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In this handout provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, a collection of fireworks found inside a backpack that belonged to Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is displayed. The backpack was recovered by law enforcement agents from a landfill in New Bedford, Massachusetts on April 26, 2013.

Photo by DOJ via Getty Images

The new jobs report is not terrible, leaving the Mark Zandis of the world to explain that sequestration will really "bite down" next quarter.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

Heben Nigatu manages to pack some hilarious social commentary about race in America into a meme listicle. Well done.

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Gavin Aronsen talks to a girl who hooked up with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

"He wanted to go further than I did, and that made me uncomfortable, and I realized that that's not the kind of person that I wanted to be around," she says. "I don't think that's necessarily being a terrorist. I think that's just called being a hands-y teenaged boy."

ABC News points out that Kelly Ayotte's answer to a skeptical background checks questioner repeated the Ted Cruz line—it might have been a slippery slope to background checks! (Side note: Why were NBC News and ABC News, national, at Ayotte's town hall? Safe theory: She's the only "no" vote fairly close to New York City. To find another "no" from someone seen as a moderate, if you're in D.C. or New York, you have to fly to Ohio for Rob Portman or South Carolina for Lindsey Graham.)

Related: The new president of the NRA is a trip.

And Ben Shapiro earns the ire of Captain America.

Correction, May 3, 2013: This post originally misspelled Gavin Aronsen's last name.

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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