The People's Guide to CPAC 2013

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Feb. 15 2013 2:59 PM

The People's Guide to CPAC 2013

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Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin waves to the crowd after addressing the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, on February 11, 2012 in Washington, DC.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Everybody gets his/her jabs in when the Conservative Political Action Conference puts out its schedule. I'll beat 'em to it by pointing out that the schedule is here, and includes these highlights:

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

Intellectual dues-paying watch: Derek Khanna, last seen getting laid off from the Republican Study Committee over a bold memo on copyright law, appears on a panel debating the much-higher-polling, much-less-necessary Balanced Budget Amendment.

Sharia Law accusation watch: The perennial "conservative inclusion" panel, which includes failed 2012 congressional candidate Mia Love and former congressman Artur Davis, is moderated by Suhail Khan, the guy always targeted by sharia paranoiacs.

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Recycling Watch: There'll be a Friday screening of Hillary: The Movie, the Citizens United documentary designed to hurt the sure-thing 2008 Democratic presidential nominee (oops), accidentally the tinder (thanks to a lawsuit) for the age of Super PACs. It will tell CPACers "what you need to know about the would be presidential candidate," albeit with more Dick Morris than they want at this point.

"Investigative Journalist" Watch: John Solomon, last seen completely failing to run the Center for Public Integrity, will appear on a panel about Benghazi.

Gasland Watch: Not one but two responses to the anti-fracking doc Gasland will be screened: Fracking Brilliant (which I have a copy of and need to review) and Truthland.

John Galt watch: A Saturday panel titled "Has Atlas Shrugged? Business in America" will feature Carly Fiorina (whose business career wasn't exactly done in by Obama) and will be moderated, if she accepts the invite, by CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter.