From the Maker of Unskewed Polling Comes: The Obama Voter Fraud Map

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Nov. 20 2012 12:18 PM

From the Maker of Unskewed Polling Comes: The Obama Voter Fraud Map

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In the last weeks of the election, Dean Chambers became famous for putting into numbers what other conservative put into words. The polls that showed Mitt Romney losing must, said Chambers, have been skewed. He launched UnSkewedPolls.com to recalibrate all national and state polling data to match the electorate he expected in November. He never showed less than a Romney win.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

Anyway, the polls were right. Chambers has moved on, launching BarackOFraudo.com, "exposing how they stole the 2012 election." It leads off with a map of the 2012 election that blacks out Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida, and Virginia. They are "states won by Obama fraud." What's Chambers going on for that?

"I'm getting credible information of evidence in those states that there enough numbers that are questionable and could have swung the election," he says. "I'm only putting good credible information on there, like the actual vote counts, reports, and mainstream publications reporting voter fraud. There's a lot of chatter, though. There are articles people have sent me that don't hold up. Crazy stuff."

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What's not crazy? "Things like the 59 voting divisions of Philadelphia where Romney received zero votes," says Chambers. "Even Larry Sabato said that should be looked into." (I've looked into this: 57 precincts gave McCain no votes in 2008. There's such a thing as a 99% Democratic precinct, and such a thing as a 99% Republican precinct.) Same story in Ohio. "Some of the precincts or divisions in cleveland were projected to be 99% Obama. That's a part of the state where it's known that a lot of ballot box scamming has been done in the past. There were isolated reports of people voting for Romney and having votes changed, though they didn't get much attention.

What about Virginia, then? "When votes were being counted on election night, 97% of the precincts were counted, and Romney was still leading 50-49," says Chambers. "When that remaining 3% were counted, a lead of 80,000 or so votes for Romney were turned into 120,000 for Obama." I pointed out that Virginia's stagger-stop-stagger count often works like that, with Democrats gaining in the end. "I was surprised it wasn't being projected for Romney when 97% was in," said Chambers. (The state was actually called earlier based on vote patterns.)

Chambers and I concluded our chat without convincing one another of our rightness. He finished by pointing out that the margins in the blacked-out states were, if you added them up, not huge: "The margin of those combined was 381,000 and change." (The margin is slightly smaller than the population of Minneapolis.)

"I do need to put a page on the site explaining all of this," he said.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter.