Opening Act: Because of His Worldview

Weigel
Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Nov. 13 2012 8:38 AM

Opening Act: Because of His Worldview

I'm trusting my brilliant colleague Fred Kaplan to follow the Petraeus scandal, though I do see odd angles crop up from time to time.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

[T]he agent became convinced — incorrectly, the official said — that the case had stalled. Because of his “worldview,” as the official put it, he suspected a politically motivated cover-up to protect President Obama. The agent alerted Eric Cantor.
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Eli Saslow finds the pathos in Republican America.

Cox stared at the actual results on her computer and tried to imagine what the majority of her country believed.
“Virginia went blue? Really?” she said. “Southern-values Virginia?”
“And Colorado? Who the heck is living in Colorado? Do they want drugs, dependency, indulgence? Don’t they remember what this country is about?”

The embarrassment over the GOP's flawed polling will never end.

Democrats "must be looking at us like we're the biggest f----- morons in the world," one frustrated Republican said. "That's what I'd be doing."

And Jonathan Martin pisses off a lot of people by telling conservatives that they rely too much on media that keeps the truth away from them.

In the fall of the past two presidential campaigns, those in the conservative cocoon were talking about, respectively, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright and Obama as a black radical, and the seemingly impeachment-worthy scandal surrounding the deaths of U.S. officials in Libya. Meanwhile, on the actual campaign trail, John McCain and Mitt Romney showed little interest in even mentioning either topic.
And the entertainers’ power isn’t just with gullible grass-roots activists who are likely to believe whatever nefarious rumor about Obama is forwarded to them in an e-mail chain — it’s with donors, too.

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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