Opening Act: Chillicothe

Weigel
Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Nov. 1 2012 8:11 AM

Opening Act: Chillicothe

I'm on my way to southeast Ohio and will be in the state through the remainder of the election. That could mean I'm done six days from now. It could mean I'm joining international news crews outside county board of elections offices, waiting for news on provisional ballots. We'll figure this out as we go.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

Alec McGillis chastises the media for not getting the scoop on Romney's bundlers and taxes.

[Tad] Devine recalls a time the 1988 presidential campaign when someone very high up at the New York Times -- he thinks it may even have been the then-publisher, the recently deceased Arthur Sulzberger —sent Devine a letter at the Dukakis campaign and demanded the release of all of running mate Lloyd Bentsen’s financial and health records, beyond the little the campaign had put out. The campaign called back and said it was reluctant to do so. As Devine recalls, the Times executive “said, ‘We’d like the records and if we don't get them, it’s going to be a problem, okay? Bye.’ I was like, ‘Oh, shit.’” The campaign got the records together and released them. Why isn’t anyone doing the equivalent today? “Maybe there’s nobody like that anymore,” said Devine. “But maybe if everyone got together, the TV networks and the major newspapers, and demanded it...”
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Via my colleague Dahlia Lithwick, some 100-proof nightmare fuel: The states with the riskiest election tech.

Not the best headline for Romney in Toledo, where they seem to pay attention to details of the auto industry's hires.

Nick Gillespie makes the best case for a wasted vote.

The political media send great resources after candidates in order to catch them making verbal flubs, and Joe Biden noticed.

If Barack Obama is re-elected, Jonathan Chait's columns will be as useful and involved a record of the event as... I was about to say "H.L. Mencken and the Scopes trial," but that sounds pretentious.

I'm not sure how many Nebraskans are still moved by Chuck Hagel, but then I had no idea Bob Kerrey could make his Senate bid competitive. David Rogers had some idea. Read his profile of the race, with this quote:

They can’t say I sat on my ass and watched my home state elect the tea party.

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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