Opening Act: Horses and Bayonets

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Oct. 23 2012 8:06 AM

Opening Act: Horses and Bayonets

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Oh, presidential debates, how I will miss you. I'll miss the foreign press using its rare and expensive access to campaign strategists and senators on questions like: "Why did you win tonight?" I'll miss the colleges and Commission for Presidential Debates charging $40 for seats and $175 for wi-fi. I'll miss the young man in Denver who stalked the media seats with a sort of mifi geiger counter, demanding that reporters turn off their devices and pay that $175. I'll miss Lynn University, and its bold theory that putting law enforcement at random locations around the campus perimeter is a more effective guidiance than putting some signs up telling people where to go. Back to real America now.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. You can reach him at daveweigel@gmail.com, or tweet at him @daveweigel.

Brian Beutler delicately explains how Obama made Romney answer for his past. Tried to, anyway.

Benjy Sarlin has some fun asking Romney staff to explain how the arrest of Ahmedinejad would actually work.

“I think it would remove probably one of the most anti-Jewish, anti-Israel, pro-genocide members of that regime in Tehran,” he told TPM after the debate. As to whether he would actually be arrested: “I’m hoping that he would be indicted and that action would unfold following that indictment. Absolutely.”
Others in the Romney camp seemed a little unsure of how the indictment would play out. John Sununu, a top Romney surrogate, told TPM after the debate that the hypothetical charges wouldn’t even be about Israel, but about the violent repression of his own people.

Glenn Kessler asks what the hell Romney meant when he said Syria was Iran's "route to the sea."

Romney runs the ultimate "me or your lying eyes" ad, based on a moment that his campaign crowed about yesterday.

Here's Kessler again, explaining -- as if the lack of proof of Obama apologizing in this video was not enough -- why the "apology tour" did not happen.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. You can reach him at daveweigel@gmail.com, or tweet at him @daveweigel.