Dinesh D'Souza Parts With His University Job Over Marriage Scandal

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Oct. 18 2012 3:04 PM

Dinesh D'Souza Parts With His University Job Over Marriage Scandal

The evangelical magazine World broke the news: Dinesh D'Souza had disturbed some Christians by showing up a conference with a "fiance." D'Souza, as far as his fans knew, was still married to a woman closer to his own age. According to reporter Warren Cole Smith, the pundit -- and now filmmaker -- "filed for divorce only on Oct. 4, the day I spoke with him." When Christianity Today followed up and asked D'Souza whether he'd had an affair, the writer turned evasive: "Look, the issue here is that World is attributing to me an admission that I never made."

Today, D'Souza is out as president of The King's College. The statement asks for "prayers for his family," which isn't so subtle.

After careful consultation with the Board and with Dinesh, we have accepted his resignation to allow him to attend to his personal and family needs. We thank him for his service and significant contribution to the College over the last two years.
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D'Souza says he met the new girl, Denise Joseph, just three months ago. That was after more than a year of stepped-up promotion for his theories about Barack Obama's past, and at the start of promotion for the film based on that work, 2016. Joseph's public blog posts suggest that the match was made to happen.

The Real Slim Shady's life (sorry Eminem, I love ya but it isn't you) continues to be shrouded in more mystery than a secret society, even as famed conservative thinker Dinesh D'Souza all but proves how dangerously and definitively our President's past has influenced his present policies.

Still, what's the larger significance of this story? D'Souza's 2016 success had almost nothing to do with him personally. The author plays a starring, Michael Moore-like role in the film, but only mentions his family in an aside about how both he and Obama got married the same year. I don't think the spread of the "Kenyan anti-colonialism" thesis suffers at all from this. Ask the first politician to promote the theory: Newt Gingrich.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter.