Opening Act: Binders Full of Women

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Oct. 17 2012 8:27 AM

Opening Act: Binders Full of Women

President Obama and presidential candidate Mitt Romney participate in the second presidential debate.
President Obama and presidential candidate Mitt Romney participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, in Hempstead, New York, on Tuesday moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley.

Photo by Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images.

NEW YORK -- That was an odd line, wasn't it? And scrutiny isn't making it look better.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

What actually happened was that in 2002 -- prior to the election, not even knowing yet whether it would be a Republican or Democratic administration -- a bipartisan group of women in Massachusetts formed MassGAP to address the problem of few women in senior leadership positions in state government. There were more than 40 organizations involved with the Massachusetts Women's Political Caucus (also bipartisan) as the lead sponsor.
They did the research and put together the binder full of women qualified for all the different cabinet positions, agency heads, and authorities and commissions. They presented this binder to Governor Romney when he was elected.
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Obama won the post-debate polls.

Josh Voorhees catalogues the wonderful, necessary rule violations.

The Forward celebrates the chosen, undecided people.

Potheads win over the heartland.

Pro-legalization groups including the ACLU studied exit polling, conducted their own focus group research, found moderate spokesmen, and tweaked proposals to try to build “trust” with a middle Americathat has grown steadily more accepting of pot use, yet, as Prop. 19 showed, remains wary of the impact of making the drug legal.

And John Dickerson recaps the debate as only he can.

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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