Christie Messiah Watch: Simi Valley Edition

Weigel
Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Sept. 28 2011 9:53 AM

Christie Messiah Watch: Simi Valley Edition

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SIMI VALLEY, CA - SEPTEMBER 27: Former first lady Nancy Reagan (C) is joined by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and Gayle Wilson (L), wife of former California Gov. Pete Wilson, before Christie delivers remarks during the Perspectives on Leadership Forum at the Reagan Library on September 27, 2011 in Simi Valley, California. Influential Republicans are urging Christie to run for president and are prepared to raise money. Christie is on a Republican Party fund-raising tour with stops in Missouri and California including a speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

It's time for the second edition of Christie Messiah Watch, that feature in which we see who's forgotten a lesson of 2008: That a politician who can deliver a good speech and get cheers from a friendly audience may not single-handedly fix everything.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

I have never seen a crowd so literally desperate for someone to run for president, nor seen such a heartfelt and frank appeal to someone to run as from the woman who got up in the balcony to implore Christie to think about (he didn’t say he wouldn’t). The governor seemed moved by the entire experience. His speech was plain-spoken rather than eloquent, but benefited from Christie’s emphatic and sincere delivery.
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Never? Really? I seem to recall some crowds fond of Senate candidate-then-senator Barack Obama.

In the speech, delivered clearly and with passion, Governor Christie sounded — well — it was as you would expect at the Reagan Library: simply Reaganesque.

We can stop right there. No higher praise exists.

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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